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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K

(Mark One)
x
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
 
Or
o
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
For the transition period from ________ to ___________

Commission File No. 0-23047


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SIGA Technologies, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
13-3864870
(State or other jurisdiction of
(IRS Employer Identification. No.)
incorporation or organization)
 
 
 
31 East 62nd Street
10065
New York, NY
(zip code)
(Address of principal executive offices)
 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 672-9100
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
common stock, $.0001 par value
The Nasdaq Global Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act Yes o No x.
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act Yes o No x.
 
Note—Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act from their obligations under those Sections.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No o.
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.o.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (check one): Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer x Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company o Emerging growth company o.
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13 (a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes o No x.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required by section 12,13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. Yes o No o.

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based upon the closing sale price of the common stock on June 30, 2018 as reported on The Nasdaq Global Market was approximately $314,197,559.
 
As of February 15, 2019 the registrant had outstanding 80,941,524 shares of common stock.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The following document is incorporated herein by reference: 


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Document
Parts Into Which Incorporated
Proxy Statement for the Company’s 2019 Annual
Part III
Meeting of Stockholders
 
 


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SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
FORM 10-K

Table of Contents
 
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





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Part I
Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including certain statements contained in “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements relating to the progress of SIGA’s development programs and timelines for bringing products to market, delivering products to the U.S Strategic National Stockpile and the enforceability of the 2011 BARDA Contract and the 2018 BARDA Contract (each as defined below, and collectively, the "BARDA Contracts") with the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (“BARDA”). The words or phrases “can be,” “expects,” “may affect,” “may depend,” “believes,” “estimate,” “project” and similar words and phrases are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties and SIGA cautions you that any forward-looking information provided by or on behalf of SIGA is not a guarantee of future performance. SIGA’s actual results could differ materially from those anticipated by such forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, some of which are beyond SIGA’s control, including, but not limited to, (i) the risk that BARDA elects, in its sole discretion as permitted under the BARDA Contracts, not to exercise all, or any, of the options under those contracts, (ii) the risk that SIGA may not complete performance under the BARDA Contracts on schedule or in accordance with contractual terms, (iii) the risk that the BARDA Contracts are modified or canceled at the request or requirement of the U.S. government, (iv) the risk that the nascent international biodefense market does not develop to a degree that allows SIGA to successfully market TPOXX® internationally, (v) the risk that potential products, including the IV formulation of TPOXX®, or potential alternative uses of TPOXX® that appear promising to SIGA or its collaborators, cannot be shown to be efficacious or safe in subsequent pre-clinical or clinical trials, (vi) the risk that SIGA or its collaborators will not obtain appropriate or necessary governmental approvals to market these or other potential products or uses, (vii) the risk that SIGA may not be able to secure or enforce sufficient legal rights in its products, including intellectual property protection, (viii) the risk that any challenge to SIGA’s patent and other property rights, if adversely determined, could affect SIGA’s business and, even if determined favorably, could be costly, (ix) the risk that regulatory requirements applicable to SIGA’s products may result in the need for further or additional testing or documentation that will delay or prevent seeking or obtaining needed approvals to market these products, (x) the risk that one or more protests could be filed and upheld in whole or in part or other governmental action taken, in either case leading to a delay of performance under the 2018 BARDA Contract or other governmental contracts, (xi) the risk that the volatile and competitive nature of the biotechnology industry may hamper SIGA’s efforts to develop or market its products, (xii) the risk that changes in domestic or foreign economic and market conditions may affect SIGA’s ability to advance its research or may affect its products adversely, (xiii) the effect of federal, state, and foreign regulation, including drug regulation and international trade regulation, on SIGA’s businesses, (xiv) the risk that the U.S. government’s responses (including inaction) to the national or global economic situation may affect SIGA’s business adversely and (xv) the risk that SIGA’s internal controls will not be effective in detecting or preventing a misstatement in SIGA’s financial statements, as well as the risks and uncertainties included in Item 1A “Risk Factors” of this Form 10-K. All such forward-looking statements are current only as of the date on which such statements were made. SIGA does not undertake any obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which any such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

Item 1. Business

Overview
 
SIGA Technologies, Inc. is referred to throughout this report as “SIGA,” “the Company,” “we” or “us.”
 
We are a commercial-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the health security market. Health security comprises countermeasures for biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear attacks (biodefense market), vaccines and therapies for emerging infectious diseases, and health preparedness. Our lead product is an oral formulation of TPOXX® (“oral TPOXX®”), an antiviral drug for the treatment of human smallpox disease caused by variola virus.

On July 13, 2018 the United States Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox. Oral TPOXX® is a novel small-molecule drug that has been delivered to the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (“Strategic Stockpile”) under the Project BioShield Act of 2004 (“Project BioShield”). Concurrent with the approval, the FDA granted the Company's request for a Priority Review Voucher (“PRV”). A PRV is a voucher that may be used to obtain an accelerated FDA review of a product candidate. On October 31, 2018, the Company sold its PRV for cash consideration of $80.0 million.
 
BARDA Contracts-TPOXX®
    
    

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2018 BARDA Contract

On September 10, 2018, the Company entered into a contract with BARDA pursuant to which SIGA agreed to deliver up to 1,488,000 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile, and to manufacture and deliver to the Strategic Stockpile, or store as vendor-managed inventory, up to 212,000 courses of the intravenous (IV) formulation of TPOXX® (“IV TPOXX®”). Additionally, the contract includes funding from BARDA for advanced development of IV TPOXX®; post-marketing activities for oral and IV TPOXX®, and supportive procurement activities. The contract with BARDA (as amended, modified, or supplemented from time to time, the “2018 BARDA Contract”) currently contemplates, as of February 28, 2019, up to approximately $600.1 million of payments, of which approximately $51.7 million of payments are included within the base period of performance of five years, approximately $12.2 million of payments are related to exercised options and up to approximately $536.2 million of payments are currently specified as unexercised options. BARDA may choose in its sole discretion when, or whether, to exercise any of the unexercised options. The period of performance for options is up to ten years from the date of entry into the 2018 BARDA Contract and such options could be exercised at any time during the contract term, including during the base period of performance. Initially, the 2018 BARDA Contract specified payments of up to approximately $628.7 million; on February 21, 2019, a cost-reimbursement plus fixed fee option for post-marketing, and other activities for oral TPOXX® was modified to $12.2 million (from $40.8 million) based on updated planning. As such, total potential payments currently specified under the 2018 BARDA Contract are $600.1 million.

The base period of performance specifies potential payments of approximately $51.7 million for the following activities: payments of approximately $11.1 million for the delivery of approximately 35,700 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile; payments of $8.0 million for the manufacture of 20,000 courses of final drug product of IV TPOXX® ("IV FDP"), of which $3.2 million of payments are related to the manufacture of bulk drug substance ("IV BDS") to be used in the manufacture of IV FDP; payments of approximately $32.0 million to fund advanced development of IV TPOXX®; and payments of approximately $0.6 million for supportive procurement activities. As of December 31, 2018, the Company has received $3.2 million for the manufacture of IV BDS; such bulk drug substance is expected to be used for the manufacture of 20,000 courses of IV FDP.

Exercised options specify potential payments up to approximately $12.2 million for funding of post-marketing activities for oral TPOXX®.

Unexercised options specify potential payments up to approximately $536.2 million in total (if all options are exercised). There are options for the following activities: payments of up to $450.2 million for the delivery of up to approximately 1,452,300 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile; payments of up to $76.8 million for the manufacture of up to 192,000 courses of IV FDP, of which up to $30.7 million of payments would be paid upon the manufacture of IV BDS to be used in the manufacture of IV FDP; payments of up to approximately $3.6 million to fund post-marketing activities for IV TPOXX®; and payments of up to approximately $5.6 million for supportive procurement activities.

The options related to IV TPOXX® are divided into two primary manufacturing steps. There are options related to the manufacture of bulk drug substance (“IV BDS Options”), and there are corresponding options (for the same number of IV courses) for the manufacture of final drug product (“IV FDP Options”). BARDA may choose to exercise any, all, or none of these options in its sole discretion. The 2018 BARDA Contract includes: three separate IV BDS Options, each providing for the bulk drug substance equivalent of 64,000 courses of IV TPOXX®; and three separate IV FDP Options, each providing for 64,000 courses of final drug product of IV TPOXX®. BARDA has the sole discretion as to whether to simultaneously exercise IV BDS Options and IV FDP Options, or whether to make independent exercise decisions. If BARDA decides to only exercise IV BDS Options, then the Company would receive payments up to $30.7 million; alternatively, if BARDA decides to exercise both IV BDS Options and IV FDP Options, then the Company would receive payments up to $76.8 million. For each set of options relating to a specific group of courses (for instance, the IV BDS and IV FDP options that reference the same 64,000 courses), BARDA has the option to independently purchase IV BDS or IV FDP.
    
2011 BARDA Contract

On May 13, 2011, the Company signed a contract with BARDA pursuant to which BARDA agreed to buy from the Company 1.7 million courses of oral TPOXX®. Additionally, the Company agreed to contribute to BARDA 300,000 courses at no additional cost to BARDA.

The contract with BARDA (as amended, modified, or supplemented from time to time the "2011 BARDA Contract”) includes a base contract, as modified, (“2011 Base Contract”) as well as options. The 2011 Base Contract specifies approximately $508.7 million of payments (including exercised options), of which, as of December 31, 2018, $459.8 million has been received

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by the Company for the manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of oral TPOXX® and $43.9 million has been received for certain reimbursements in connection with development and supportive activities. Approximately $5.0 million remains eligible to be received in the future for reimbursements of development and supportive activities.

For courses of oral TPOXX® that have been physically delivered to the Strategic Stockpile under the 2011 BARDA Contract, there are product replacement obligations, including: (i) a product replacement obligation in the event that the final version of oral TPOXX® approved by the FDA was different from any courses of oral TPOXX® that had been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile (the "FDA Approval Replacement Obligation"); (ii) a product replacement obligation, at no cost to BARDA, in the event that oral TPOXX® is recalled or deemed to be recalled for any reason; and (iii) a product replacement obligation in the event that oral TPOXX® does not meet any specified label claims. On July, 13, 2018, the FDA approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox and there is no difference between the approved product and courses in the Strategic Stockpile. As such, the possibility of the FDA Approval Replacement Obligation resulting in any future replacements of product within the Strategic Stockpile is remote.

The 2011 BARDA Contract includes options. On July 30, 2018, the 2011 BARDA Contract was modified and BARDA exercised its option relating to FDA approval of 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX® for which the Company was paid $50.0 million in August 2018. With the option exercise, the 2011 BARDA Contract was modified so that the 2011 Base Contract increased by $50.0 million. Remaining options, if all would be exercised by BARDA, would result in aggregate payments to the Company of $72.7 million, including up to $58.3 million of funding for development and supportive activities such as work on a post-exposure prophylaxis ("PEP") indication for TPOXX® and/or $14.4 million of funding for production-related activities related to warm-base manufacturing. BARDA may choose in its sole discretion not to exercise any or all of the unexercised options. In 2015, BARDA exercised two options related to extending the indication of the drug to the geriatric and pediatric populations. The stated value of those exercises was minimal.

The 2011 BARDA Contract expires in September 2020.

Lead Product-TPOXX®

SIGA believes that TPOXX® is among the first new small-molecule drugs delivered to the Strategic Stockpile under Project BioShield. Oral TPOXX® is a novel, patented drug that is easy to store, transport and administer. On July 13, 2018, the FDA approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox. Oral TPOXX® labeling, approved by the FDA, limits sales of oral TPOXX® in the U.S. to those for the Strategic Stockpile. Under the 2011 BARDA Contract, 1.7 million courses of oral TPOXX® were sold to BARDA and delivered to the Strategic Stockpile between 2013 and 2017. Courses delivered under the 2011 BARDA Contract have an FDA-approved shelf life of seven years. Under the 2018 BARDA Contract, SIGA can deliver up to 1.7 million courses of TPOXX® (of which 1,488,000 courses would be oral TPOXX® and 212,000 courses would be IV TPOXX®) to the Strategic Stockpile, at the option of BARDA.

For IV TPOXX®, SIGA initiated a phase I single ascending dose safety and pharmacokinetic study in the first quarter of 2016 and completed the enrollment and dosing of the final cohort of the study in March 2017. The Company initiated a phase I multiple ascending dose safety and pharmaceutical study in the 3rd quarter of 2018 and completed enrollment and dosing of the final cohort in December 2018.

Manufacturing

SIGA does not have a manufacturing infrastructure and does not intend to develop one for the manufacture of TPOXX®. SIGA relies on and uses third parties known as Contract Manufacturing Organizations (“CMOs”) to procure commercial raw materials and supplies, and to manufacture TPOXX®. SIGA's CMOs apply methods and controls in facilities that are used for manufacturing, processing, packaging, testing, analyzing and holding pharmaceuticals which conform to current good manufacturing practices (“cGMP”), the standard set by the FDA for manufacture of pharmaceuticals intended for human use.

Oral TPOXX®:

For the manufacture of oral TPOXX® under the BARDA contracts, the Company uses the following CMOs: Albemarle Corporation (“Albemarle”); Powdersize, LLC (“Powdersize”); Catalent Pharma Solutions LLC (“Catalent”); and Packaging Coordinators, LLC ("PCI").

In August 2011, SIGA entered into an agreement with Albemarle. Such agreement was amended in April 2015 and expired in April 2018. On October 1, 2018, SIGA entered into a new agreement with Albemarle. Albemarle manufactures, tests and supplies

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active pharmaceutical ingredient (“API”) for use in TPOXX®. SIGA agreed that, during the term of the new agreement, SIGA will purchase 100% of its internal and external API requirements for TPOXX® from Albemarle until the later of (i) September 30, 2021 and (ii) such time as SIGA has purchased twelve metric tons of API from Albemarle under the new agreement. From and after the later of: (i) September 30, 2021, or (ii) such time as SIGA has purchased twelve metric tons of API from Albemarle, SIGA will purchase at least 70% of its internal and external API requirements for TPOXX® from Albemarle until the end of the term of the new agreement (as described below), unless the Company receives an offer to purchase API at a price that Albemarle is unable to match, in which event SIGA will purchase at least 30% of its internal and external API requirements for TPOXX® from Albemarle until September 30, 2023. There is no minimum amount of API kilograms that must be used or acquired by SIGA. The following events are excluded from the “100% API” requirement: (i) if a contract entered into by SIGA for the sale of final drug product (“FDP”) requires that the product used as the API for such FDP be manufactured outside the U.S. and Albemarle is unwilling or unable to subcontract such manufacture to a party or parties that meet the terms of the agreement; (ii) if a contract entered into by SIGA for the sale of FDP in an intravenous formulation requires different specifications than those provided for under the agreement and the parties are not able to reach agreement on the necessary changes to the specifications or on pricing; or (iii) if Albemarle fails to perform any of its obligations under the agreement and does not cure such failure within 30 days of written notice from SIGA. SIGA is required to pay Albemarle within 45 days of its invoice date. Pricing for API is at a fixed price per kilogram, subject to adjustment for increases in raw material costs and/or general manufacturing costs. Albemarle is required to deliver API that conforms with specifications outlined in the agreement; the Company is not required to pay for API that does not meet specifications. The Company has 120 days to reject any shipments that do not meet such specifications or are damaged. In addition to receiving payments for API deliveries, Albemarle is also paid for related services, such as stability testing. The Company’s agreement with Albemarle is currently scheduled to expire upon the earlier of: (i) September 30, 2023, or (ii) the fulfillment of delivery obligations under the 2018 BARDA Contract. Thereafter, the agreement shall renew for successive one-year renewal terms until either the Company or Albemarle provide notice of non-renewal at least 90 days prior to the expiration date of a term.

Powdersize micronizes and tests API for use in oral TPOXX®. The Company’s agreement with Powdersize was amended on January 11, 2019. The amended term ends on the tenth anniversary of the amendment date.

Catalent granulates, encapsulates, and tests oral TPOXX®. In addition, Catalent provides services related to commercial stability testing of drug product and preparation for tabulated stability and trend analysis for each time point. The Company’s agreement with Catalent has an initial term that ends on June 28, 2021. Thereafter, this agreement automatically renews for three years unless either party provides six months' notice of its desire to terminate the agreement prior to the expiration of the term. During the term of the agreement, SIGA will purchase all of its requirements for bulk product under the 2018 BARDA contract from Catalent.

PCI provides packaging services in connection with oral TPOXX®. The Company’s agreement with PCI has an initial term that ends on March 1, 2022. Thereafter, this agreement automatically renews for successive one-year periods unless either party provides 120 days' notice of its desire to terminate the agreement prior to the expiration of the term. The agreement can be terminated earlier than March 1, 2022 under certain conditions.

Intravenous (IV) formulation of TPOXX®:

The Company is currently negotiating with CMOs with respect to raw material procurement and services in connection with the manufacture of IV TPOXX®. There is no assurance that the Company will be able to enter into agreements with service providers in connection with the manufacture of IV TPOXX® or the procurement of raw materials.

Market for Biological Defense Programs
 
The market for biodefense countermeasures reflects continued awareness of the threat of global terror and biowarfare activity. The U.S. government is the largest source of development and procurement funding for academic institutions and biopharmaceutical companies conducting biodefense research or developing vaccines, anti-infectives and immunotherapies directed at potential agents of bioterror or biowarfare. U.S. government spending on biodefense programs includes development funding awarded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, BARDA and the Department of Defense (“DoD”), and procurement of countermeasures by BARDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) and the DoD. For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, the budget for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides an annual appropriation of more than $1.9 billion for activities related to advanced development and procurement of medical countermeasures for biological and other threats to civilian populations.



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In addition to the U.S. government, we believe that potential additional markets for the sale of biodefense countermeasures include:

foreign governments, including both defense and public health agencies;
non-governmental organizations and multinational companies, including transportation and security companies
healthcare providers, including hospitals and clinics; and
state and local governments, which may be interested in these products to protect, among others, emergency responders, such as police, fire and emergency medical personnel.

At present, oral TPOXX® is not approved for sale beyond the Strategic Stockpile. The Company would need to meet regulatory requirements before sales were made in the U.S. beyond the Strategic Stockpile.

Research Agreements and Grants
 
The Company has an R&D program for IV TPOXX®. This program is funded by the 2018 BARDA Contract and a separate development contract with BARDA ("IV Formulation R&D Contract"). The IV Formulation R&D Contract has a period of performance that terminates on December 30, 2020. As of December 31, 2018, the IV Formulation R&D Contract provides for future aggregate research and development funding of approximately $15.1 million. See Note 3 in the consolidated financial statements regarding the 2018 BARDA Contract.

Contracts and grants include, among other things, options that may or may not be exercised at BARDA’s discretion. Moreover, contracts and grants contain customary terms and conditions including BARDA’s right to terminate or restructure a contract or grant for convenience at any time. As such, we may not receive all available funds.

General

We receive cash payments from BARDA on a monthly basis, as services are performed or goods are purchased. Amounts under contract and grant agreements are not guaranteed and can be canceled at any time for reasons such as non-performance or convenience of the U.S. government and, if canceled, we will not receive funds for additional work under the agreements.

Competition
 
The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are characterized by rapidly evolving technology and intense competition. Our competitors include many major pharmaceutical companies, each of which has financial, technical and marketing resources significantly greater than ours. Biotechnology and other pharmaceutical competitors in the biodefense space include, but are not limited to, Emergent BioSolutions, Bavarian Nordic AS, and Chimerix Inc. Academic institutions, governmental agencies and other public and private research organizations are also conducting research activities and seeking patent protection and may commercialize products on their own or through joint ventures.
 
TPOXX® faces significant competition for U.S. government funding for both development and procurement of medical countermeasures for biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear threats, diagnostic testing systems, and other emergency preparedness countermeasures.
 
Our commercial opportunities could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, more effective, have fewer side effects, are more convenient or are less expensive than products that we may develop. In addition, we may not be able to compete effectively if our product candidates do not satisfy governmental procurement requirements, particularly requirements of the U.S. government with respect to biodefense products.

Human Resources and Research Facilities
 
As of February 15, 2019, we had 41 full-time employees. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement, and we consider our employee relations to be satisfactory. Our research and development facilities are located in Corvallis, Oregon, where we lease approximately 10,276 square feet under a lease agreement that commenced on January 1, 2018 and which expires in December 2019. This lease has two successive renewal options - the first for two years and the second for three years.

Intellectual Property and Proprietary Rights


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SIGA’s commercial success will depend in part on its ability to obtain and maintain patent protection in the U.S. and the rest of the world for its proprietary technologies, drug targets, and potential products and to preserve its trade secrets. Because of the substantial length of time and expense associated with bringing potential products through the development and regulatory clearance processes to reach the marketplace, the pharmaceutical industry places considerable importance on obtaining patent and trade secret protection. The patent positions of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies can be highly uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions. No consistent policy regarding the breadth of claims allowed in biotechnology patents across various jurisdictions has emerged to date. Accordingly, SIGA cannot predict the type and extent of claims that will be allowed in pending patent applications.

SIGA also relies upon trade secret protection for its confidential and proprietary information. No assurance can be given that other companies will not independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary information and techniques or otherwise gain access to SIGA’s trade secrets or that SIGA can meaningfully protect its trade secrets.

SIGA exclusively owns its key patent portfolios, which relate to its leading drug candidate TPOXX® (also known as ST-246, tecovirimat). As of February 28, 2019, the TPOXX® patent portfolio has seven patent families consisting of 21 U.S. utility patents, 57 issued foreign patents, five U.S. utility patent applications, and 41 foreign patent applications.

The principal and material issued patents covering TPOXX® are described in the table below.

Patent Number
Country
Protection Conferred
Issue Date
Expiration Date
US 7737168
United States
Method of treating orthopoxvirus infection with ST-246
June 15, 2010
May 3, 2027^
US 8039504
United States
Pharmaceutical compositions and unit dosage forms containing ST-246
October 18, 2011
July 23, 2027
US 7687641
United States
Method of manufacturing ST-246
March 30, 2010
September 27, 2024
US 8124643
United States
Composition of matter for the ST-246 compound and Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246
February 28, 2012
June 18, 2024^
US 7956197
United States
Method of manufacturing ST-246
June 7, 2011
June 18, 2024
US 8530509
United States
Pharmaceutical compositions containing a mixture of compounds including ST-246
September 10, 2013
June 18, 2024
US 8802714
United States
Method of treating orthopoxvirus infection with a mixture of compounds including ST-246
August 12, 2014
June 18, 2024
US 9045418
United States
Method of manufacturing ST-246
June 2, 2015
June 18, 2024
US 9233097
United States
Liquid Pharmaceutical formulations containing ST-246
January 12, 2016
August 2, 2031
US 9339466
United States
Certain polymorph of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorph and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorph
May 17, 2016
March 23, 2031
US 9546137
United States
Methods of preparing ST-246
January 17, 2017
August 14, 2033
US 9744154
United States
Polymorphic forms of ST-246 and methods of preparation
August 29, 2017
March 23, 2031
US 9862683
United States
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
January 9, 2018
August 14, 2033
US 9670158
United States
Amorphous Tecovirimat preparation
June 6, 2017
July 11, 2034
US 9889119
United States
Amorphous Tecovirimat preparation
February 13, 2018
July 11, 2034
US 9907859
United States
ST-246 liquid formulations and methods
March 6, 2018
August 2, 2031
US 10029985
United States
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
July 24, 2018
August 14, 2033
US 10045963
United States
Amorphous Tecovirimat preparation
August 14, 2018
July 11, 2034
US 10045964
United States
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorphs
August 14, 2018
March 23, 2031
US 10124071
United States
ST-246 liquid formulations and methods
November 13, 2018
August 2, 2031
US 10155723
United States
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
December 18, 2018
August 14, 2033
SG 184201
Singapore
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorphs
June 22, 2015
March 23, 2031
RU 2578606
Russia
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and their use in treating orthopoxvirus
March 27, 2016
March 23, 2031
OA 16109
OAPI/Africa
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and their use in treating orthopoxvirus
October 31, 2013
March 23, 2031
NZ 602578
New Zealand
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and their use in treating orthopoxvirus
December 2, 2014
March 23, 2031

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MX 326231
Mexico
Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and one or more additional ingredients and dosage unit forms containing ST-246
December 11, 2014
April 23, 2027
MX 348481
Mexico
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
June 15, 2017
April 23, 2027
MX 347795
Mexico
ST-246 liquid formulations and methods
May 15, 2017
August 2, 2031
MX 361428
Mexico
Polymorphic forms of ST-246 and methods of preparation
December 6, 2018
March 23, 2031
KR 101868117
Korea
ST-246 liquid formulations and methods
June 8, 2018
August 2, 2031
JP 4884216
Japan
Therapeutic agent for treating orthopoxvirus including ST-246, pharmaceutical composition of matter for the ST-246 compound and method of manufacturing ST-246
December 16, 2011
June 18, 2024
JP 5657489
Japan
Method of manufacturing ST-246
December 5, 2014
June 18, 2024
JP 5898196
Japan
Liquid Pharmaceutical formulations containing ST-246
March 11, 2016
August 2, 2031
JP 6018041
Japan
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorphs
October 7, 2016
March 23, 2031
JP 6188802
Japan
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
August 10, 2017
August 14, 2033
JP 6444460
Japan
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
December 7, 2018
August 14, 2033
CN 2011800245893
China
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorphs
August 26, 2015
March 23, 2031
CN 2013800429237
China
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
June 20, 2017
August 14, 2033
CA 2529761
Canada
Use of ST-246 to treat orthopoxvirus infection, pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and composition of matter for the ST-246 compound
August 13, 2013
June 18, 2024
CA 2685153
Canada
Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and one or more additional ingredients and dosage unit forms containing ST-246
December 16, 2014
April 23, 2027
CA 2866037
Canada
Chemicals, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
May 16, 2017
April 23, 2027
CA 2807528
Canada
Liquid Pharmaceutical formulations containing ST-246
September 25, 2018
August 2, 2031
AU 2004249250
Australia
Method of treating orthopoxvirus infection, pharmaceutical composition containing ST-246 and composition of matter for the ST-246 compound
March 29, 2012
June 18, 2024
AU 2007351866
Australia
Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and one or more additional ingredients and dosage unit forms containing ST-246
January 10, 2013
June 18, 2024
AU 2011232551
Australia
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and their use in treating orthopoxvirus
February 26, 2015
March 23, 2031
AU 2011285871
Australia
Liquid Pharmaceutical formulations containing ST-246
August 6, 2015
August 2, 2031
AU 2013302764
Australia
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
April 5, 2018
August 14, 2033
AU 2012268859
Australia
Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and one or more additional ingredients and dosage unit forms containing ST-246
August 18, 2016
June 18, 2024
AU 2014290333
Australia
Amorphous Tecovirimat preparation
February 21, 2019
July 11, 2034
AP 3221
ARIPO*/Africa
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and their use in treating orthopoxvirus
April 3, 2015
March 23, 2031
ZA 2012/07141
South Africa
Certain polymorphs of ST-246, method of preparation of the polymorphs and pharmaceutical compositions containing the polymorphs
June 29, 2016
March 23, 2031

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ZA 2013/00930
South Africa
Liquid Pharmaceutical formulations containing ST-246
November 25, 2015
August 2, 2031
IL 201736
Israel
Pharmaceutical compositions containing ST-246 and one or more additional ingredients and dosage unit forms containing ST-246
October 1, 2016
April 23, 2027
IL 236944
Israel
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
February 1, 2017
August 14, 2033
IL 242666
Israel
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
December 1, 2018
April 23, 2027
AT 1638938
Austria
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
BE 1638938
Belgium
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
BE 2549871
Belgium
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
CH 1638938
Switzerland
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
CH 2549871
Switzerland
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
DE 1638938
Germany
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
DE 2549871
Germany
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
DE 2887938
Germany
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
January 10, 2018
August 14, 2033
DK 1638938
Denmark
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
DK 2549871
Denmark
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
ES 1638938
Spain
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
FI 1638938
Finland
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
FR 1638938
France
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
FR 2887938
France
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
January 10, 2018
August 14, 2033
FR 2549871
France
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
GB 1638938
United Kingdom
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
GB 2887938
United Kingdom
Methods of preparing Tecovirimat
January 10, 2018
August 14, 2033
GB 2549871
United Kingdom
Polymorphic forms of ST-246
August 22, 2018
March 23, 2031
IE 1638938
Ireland
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
IT 502017000078377
Italy
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024

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Table of Contents

NL 1638938
Netherlands
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
PL 1638938
Poland
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024
SE 1638938
Sweden
Compounds, compositions and methods for treatment and prevention of orthopoxvirus infections and associated diseases
April 12, 2017
June 18, 2024


^ A Patent Term Extension Application is pending for US 7737168, which would change the expiration date from May 3, 2027 to September 4, 2031. A Patent Term Extension Application is also pending for US 8124643, which would change the expiration date from June 18, 2024 to December 13, 2027. In the event that both US 7737168 and US 8124643 are found to be eligible for a patent term extension, SIGA would only be able to elect one of the two patents for which the extension is sought and would elect to extend US 7737168.

* ARIPO has 19 member African States as follows: Botswana, The Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.    

In addition to the patents listed in the above chart, the principal and material patent applications covering TPOXX® include patent filings in multiple jurisdictions, including the United States, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and other commercially significant markets. We hold 46 patent applications currently pending with respect to various compositions of TPOXX®, methods of manufacturing, methods of treatment, and dosage forms. Expiration dates for pending patent applications, if granted, will fall between 2024 and 2037.

FDA regulations require that patented drugs be sold under brand names that comply with various regulations. SIGA must develop and make efforts to protect these brand names for each of its products in order to avoid product piracy and to secure exclusive rights to these brand names. SIGA may expend substantial funds in developing and securing rights to adequate brand names for our products. SIGA currently has proprietary trademark rights in SIGA®, TPOXX® and other brands used by us in the United States and certain foreign countries, but we may have to develop additional trademark rights in order to comply with regulatory requirements. SIGA considers securing adequate trademark rights to be important to its business.

Government Regulation
 
Regulatory Approval Process

Regulation by governmental authorities in the United States and other countries is a significant factor in the manufacture and marketing of any biopharmaceutical product that we may develop. The nature and the extent to which such regulations may apply to us will vary depending on the nature of any particular product. Virtually all of our potential pharmaceutical products will require regulatory approval by governmental agencies prior to non-governmental commercialization. In particular, human therapeutic products are subject to rigorous pre-clinical and clinical testing and other approval procedures by the FDA and similar health authorities in foreign countries. Various federal statutes and regulations also govern or regulate the manufacturing, safety, labeling, storage, record keeping and marketing of such products. The process of obtaining these approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate federal and foreign statutes and regulations is complex and requires the expenditure of substantial resources.
 
In order to test clinically, and to manufacture and market products for diagnostic or therapeutic use, a company must comply with mandatory procedures and safety standards established by the FDA and comparable agencies in foreign countries. Before beginning human clinical testing of a potential new drug in the United States, a company must file an IND application and receive clearance from the FDA. An IND application is a summary of the pre-clinical studies that were conducted to characterize the drug, including toxicity and safety studies, information on the drug’s composition and the manufacturing and quality control procedures used to produce the drug, as well as a discussion of the human clinical studies that are being proposed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the product.

The pre-marketing clinical program required for approval by the FDA for a new drug typically involves a time-consuming and costly three-phase process. In Phase I, trials are conducted with a small number of healthy subjects to determine the early safety profile, the pattern of drug distribution, metabolism and elimination. In Phase II, trials are conducted with small groups of

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patients afflicted with a target disease in order to determine preliminary efficacy, optimal dosages and expanded evidence of safety. In Phase III, large scale, multi-center comparative trials, which may include both controlled and uncontrolled studies, are conducted with patients afflicted with a target disease in order to provide enough data for statistical proof of efficacy and safety required by the FDA and other authorities. Additional trials may be required to evaluate how a new drug interacts with other drugs as well as if the drug has any impact on cardio-vascular or other potential risks.
 
The FDA closely monitors the progress of each of the three phases of clinical testing and may, in its discretion, reevaluate, alter, suspend or terminate the testing based on the data that have been accumulated to that point and its assessment of the risk/benefit ratio to the patients involved in the testing. Estimates of the total time typically required for carrying out such clinical testing vary between two and 10 years. Upon completion of such clinical testing, a company typically submits a new drug application ("NDA") to the FDA that summarizes the results and observations of the drug during the clinical testing. Based on its review of the NDA, the FDA will decide whether to approve the drug and whether to impose any marketing restrictions or require additional post-approval clinical studies. This review process can be quite lengthy, and approval for the production and marketing of a new pharmaceutical product can require a number of years and substantial funding. There can be no assurance that any approval will be granted on a timely basis, if at all.
 
The FDA amended its regulations, effective June 30, 2002, to include the “Animal Rule” in circumstances that would permit the typical clinical testing regime to approve certain new drug and biological products used to reduce or prevent the toxicity of chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear agents not otherwise naturally present for use in humans based on evidence of safety in healthy subjects and evidence of effectiveness derived only from appropriate animal studies and any additional supporting data. The FDA has indicated that approval for therapeutic use of TPOXX® was determined under the “Animal Rule.”
 
Once the product is approved for sale, FDA regulations govern the manufacturing and marketing activities, and a post-marketing testing and surveillance program may be required to monitor a product’s usage and effects. Product approvals may be withdrawn if compliance with regulatory standards is not maintained. Many other countries in which products developed by us may be marketed impose similar regulatory processes.
 
FDA regulations also make available an alternative regulatory mechanism that may lead to use of the product under limited circumstances. The Emergency Use Authorization (“EUA”) authority allows the FDA Commissioner to strengthen the public health protections against biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear agents that may be used to attack the American people or the U.S. armed forces. Under this authority, the FDA Commissioner may allow medical countermeasures to be used in an emergency to diagnose, treat or prevent serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions caused by such agents when appropriate findings are made concerning the nature of the emergency, the availability of adequate and approved alternatives, and the quality of available data concerning the drug candidate under consideration for emergency use.
 
Legislation and Regulation Related to Bioterrorism Counteragents and Pandemic Preparedness

Because some of our drug candidates are intended for the treatment of diseases that may result from acts of bioterrorism or biowarfare or for pandemic preparedness, they may be subject to the specific legislation and regulation described below and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Project BioShield

Project BioShield and related 2006 federal legislation provide procedures for biodefense-related procurement and awarding of research grants, making it easier for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to commit funds to countermeasure projects. Project BioShield provides alternative procedures under the Federal Acquisition Regulation, the general rubric for acquisition of goods and services by the U.S. government, for procuring property or services used in performing, administering or supporting biomedical countermeasure research and development. In addition, if the Secretary of HHS deems that there is a pressing need, Project BioShield authorizes the Secretary of HHS to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer review process, for grants, contracts and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure research and development activity.

Under Project BioShield, the Secretary of HHS, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and upon the approval of the President, can contract to purchase unapproved countermeasures for the Strategic Stockpile in specified circumstances. The U.S. Congress is notified of a recommendation for a Strategic Stockpile purchase after Presidential approval. Project BioShield specifies that a company supplying the countermeasure to the Strategic Stockpile is paid on delivery of a substantial portion of the countermeasure. To be eligible for purchase under these provisions, the Secretary of HHS must determine that there are sufficient and satisfactory clinical results or research data, including data, if available, from pre-clinical

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and clinical trials, to support a reasonable conclusion that the countermeasure will qualify for approval or licensing within eight years. Project BioShield also allows the Secretary of HHS to authorize the emergency use of medical products that have not yet been approved by the FDA. To exercise this authority, the Secretary of HHS must conclude that:

the agent for which the countermeasure is designed can cause serious or life-threatening disease;
 
the product may reasonably be believed to be effective in detecting, diagnosing, treating or preventing the disease;
 
the known and potential benefits of the product outweigh its known and potential risks; and
 
there is no adequate alternative to a product that is approved and available.

Although this provision permits the Secretary of HHS to circumvent FDA approval (entirely, or in part) for procurement and use, its use in this manner would likely be limited to rare circumstances. Prior to the award of the BARDA Contract in May 2011, the Secretary of HHS concluded that TPOXX® would qualify within eight years for approval by the FDA for therapeutic use against smallpox.

Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act

The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (the "PREP Act"), provides immunity for manufacturers from claims under state or federal law for “loss” arising out of the administration or use of a “covered countermeasure” in the United States. However, injured persons may still bring a suit for “willful misconduct” against the manufacturer under some circumstances. “Covered countermeasures” include security countermeasures and “qualified pandemic or epidemic products,” including products intended to diagnose or treat pandemic or epidemic disease, as well as treatments intended to address conditions caused by such products. For these immunities to apply, the Secretary of HHS must issue a declaration in cases of public health emergency or “credible risk” of a future public health emergency. Since 2007, the Secretary of HHS has issued eight declarations under the PREP Act to protect from liability countermeasures that are necessary to prepare the nation for potential pandemics or epidemics, including a declaration on October 10, 2008 that provides immunity from tort liability as it relates to smallpox. The PREP Act was amended in 2015 to extend protection for smallpox and other countermeasures from December 31, 2015 to December 31, 2022.
 
Foreign Regulation

As noted above, in addition to regulations in the United States, we might be subject to a variety of foreign regulations governing clinical trials and commercial sales and distribution of our drug candidates. Even if we obtain FDA approval for a product, we may have to obtain approval of that product by the comparable regulatory authorities of foreign countries before we can commence clinical trials or marketing of the product in those countries. The actual time required to obtain clearance to market a product in a particular foreign jurisdiction varies substantially, based upon the type, complexity and novelty of the pharmaceutical drug candidate, the specific requirements of that jurisdiction, and in some countries whether the FDA has previously approved the drug for marketing. The requirements governing the conduct of clinical trials, marketing authorization, pricing and reimbursement vary from country to country. Certain foreign jurisdictions, including the European Union, have adopted certain biodefense-specific regulations akin to that available in the United States such as a procedure similar to the “Animal Rule” promulgated by the FDA for review and potential approval of biodefense products.
 
Regulations Regarding Government Contracting

The status of an organization as a government contractor in the United States and elsewhere means that the organization is also subject to various statutes and regulations, including the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which governs the procurement of goods and services by agencies of the United States. These governing statutes and regulations can impose stricter penalties than those normally applicable to commercial contracts, such as criminal and civil damages liability and suspension and debarment from future government contracting. In addition, pursuant to various statutes and regulations, government contracts can be subject to unilateral termination or modification by the government for convenience in the United States and elsewhere, detailed auditing requirements, statutorily controlled pricing, sourcing and subcontracting restrictions and statutorily mandated processes for adjudicating contract disputes.

Availability of Reports and Other Information
 
We file annual, quarterly, and current reports, proxy statements, and other documents with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The public may read and copy any material that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room

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at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at (800) SEC-0330. Also, the SEC maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers, including us, that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any document that we file with or furnish to the SEC at www.sec.gov.
 
In addition, our website can be found on the internet at www.siga.com. The website contains information about us and our operations. Copies of each of our filings with the SEC on Form 10-K, Form 10-Q, and Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports, can be viewed and downloaded free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after the reports and amendments are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. To view the reports, access www.siga.com, click on “Investor Relations” and “Financial Information.”
 
 The following corporate governance related documents are also available on our website:

Audit Committee Charter;
 
Compensation Committee Charter;
 
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Charter;
 
Code of Ethics and Business Conduct;

Procedure for Sending Communications to the Board of Directors;
 
Procedures for Security Holder Submission of Nominating Recommendations;
 
Policy on Confidentiality of Information and Securities Trading; and

Conflict of Interest Policy.

To review these documents, access www.siga.com and click on “Investor Relations” and “Corporate Governance.”
 
Any of the above documents can also be obtained in print by any shareholder upon request to the Secretary, SIGA Technologies, Inc., 31 E 62nd Street, 5th floor, New York, New York 10065.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
This report contains forward-looking statements and other prospective information relating to future events. These forward-looking statements and other information are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our historical results or currently anticipated results including the following:

Risks Related to Our Dependence on U.S. Government Contracts

U.S. government contracts require ongoing funding decisions by the government, and the majority of the potential revenue under the 2018 BARDA Contract is tied to options which may or may not be exercised, at the sole discretion of BARDA. Reduced or discontinued BARDA funding, or the non-exercise of contract options under the 2018 BARDA contract, could cause our business, financial condition and operating results, to suffer materially.

The funding of government programs, which fund BARDA’s purchases under the 2018 BARDA Contract, is subject to Congressional appropriations, generally made on a fiscal year basis even though a program may continue for several years. Our government customers are subject to political considerations and budgetary constraints. Our government customers are also subject to uncertainties as to continued funding of their budgets.

Additionally, government-funded contracts typically consist of a base period of performance and options for the performance of certain future activities. The value of goods and services subject to options may constitute the majority of the total value of the underlying contract, as in the case of the 2018 BARDA Contract.

The 2018 BARDA Contract is primarily option-based, with more than 80% of contract value tied to options which are exercisable in the sole discretion of BARDA. There is no guarantee that any options will be exercised, or how many options will be exercised. If some or all of the options under the 2018 BARDA Contract are not exercised, whether because levels of government expenditures and authorizations for biodefense decrease or shift to programs other than those under which BARDA purchases are funded for any reason, our business, financial condition and operating results, our business development efforts or our product development efforts may suffer materially.

Government procurement contracts are mostly set at fixed prices and such pricing is based on estimates of the time, resources and expenses required to perform these contracts. If our estimates are not accurate, we may not be able to earn an adequate return or may incur a loss under these arrangements.

The remaining unexercised options under the 2018 BARDA Contract are predominately fixed-price. We expect that our future contracts with the U.S. government for TPOXX® as well as contracts for other biodefense product candidates would also be fixed-price arrangements. Under a fixed-price contract, we are required to deliver our products at a fixed price regardless of the actual costs we incur and to absorb any costs incurred in satisfaction of our obligations. Estimating costs that are related to performance in accordance with contract specifications can be difficult, particularly where the period of performance is over several years. Our failure to anticipate technical problems, estimate costs accurately or control costs during performance of a fixed-price contract could reduce the profitability of such contract or cause a loss, which could in turn negatively affect our operating results.

We expect future operating revenues to come primarily from contracts with BARDA for the provision and maintenance of the U.S. Government’s stockpile of TPOXX®. If BARDA does not enter into additional contracts after the 2018 BARDA Contract to maintain or expand the stockpile of TPOXX®, our long-term business, financial condition and operating results could be materially harmed.

The success of our business and our operating results for the foreseeable future will be substantially dependent on the U.S. government’s commitment to maintaining or expanding its stockpile of TPOXX®. Failure to secure and perform additional contracts after the 2018 BARDA Contract to maintain or expand the stockpile of TPOXX® could have a material adverse effect on our long-term business, financial condition and operating results. Additionally, the 2018 BARDA Contract does not necessarily increase the likelihood that we will secure future comparable contracts with the U.S. government.

The success of our business with the U.S. government depends on our compliance with laws, regulations and obligations under our U.S. government contracts and various federal statutes and authorities.

Our business with the U.S. government is subject to specific procurement regulations and a variety of other legal and compliance obligations. These laws and rules include those related to:

procurement integrity;

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rates and pricing of services and goods to be reimbursed by the U.S. government;

export control;

government security regulations;

employment practices;

protection of the environment;

accuracy of records and the recording and reporting of costs; and

foreign corrupt practices.

Compliance with these obligations increases our performance and compliance costs. A finding that we have failed to comply with these regulations and requirements could lead to suspension or debarment, for cause, from government contracting or subcontracting for a period of time. The termination of a government contract or grant or relationship as a result of our failure to satisfy any of these obligations would have a material negative impact on our operations and harm our reputation and ability to procure other government contracts or grants in the future.

Unfavorable provisions in government contracts and grants, some of which may be customary, may harm our future business, financial condition and potential operating results.

Government contracts and grants customarily contain provisions that give the government substantial rights and remedies, many of which are not typically found in commercial contracts, including (but not limited to) provisions that allow the government to:

terminate existing contracts or grants, in whole or in part, for any reason or no reason;

unilaterally reduce or modify grants, contracts or subcontracts, including through the use of equitable price adjustments;

cancel multi-year contracts or grants and related orders if funds for performance for any subsequent year become unavailable;

decline to exercise an option to renew a contract or grant;

exercise an option to purchase only the minimum amount specified in a contract or grant;

decline to exercise an option to purchase the maximum amount specified in a contract or grant;

claim rights to products, including intellectual property, developed under a contract or grant;

take actions that result in a longer development timeline or higher costs than expected;

suspend or debar the contractor from doing business with the government or a specific government agency due to regulatory or compliance failures;

pursue criminal or civil remedies under the False Claims Act and the False Statements Accountability Act; and

control or prohibit the export of products.

Generally, government contracts contain provisions permitting unilateral termination or modification, in whole or in part, at the government’s convenience. Under general principles of government contracting law, if the government terminates a contract or grant for convenience, the terminated company may recover only its incurred or committed costs, settlement expenses and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If the government terminates a contract or grant for default, the defaulting company is entitled to recover costs incurred and associated profits on accepted items only and may be liable for excess costs incurred by

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the government in procuring undelivered items from another source. Our government contracts and grants, including the 2018 BARDA Contract, could be terminated under these circumstances.

Some government contracts and grants permit the government the right to use, for or on behalf of the U.S. government, any technologies developed by the contractor under a government contract. For any technology we develop under a contract or grant with such a provision, we might not be able to prohibit third parties, including our competitors, from using that technology in providing products and services to the government.

Changing political or social factors and opposition, including protests and potential related litigation, may delay or impair our ability to market TPOXX® and any other biodefense product candidates and may require us to spend time and money to address these issues.

Products developed to treat diseases caused by or to combat the threat of bioterrorism or biowarfare will be subject to changing political and social environments. The political and social responses to bioterrorism and biowarfare have been unpredictable and much debated. Changes in the perception of the risk that military personnel or civilians could be exposed to biological agents as weapons of bioterrorism or biowarfare may delay or cause resistance to bringing investigational products to market or limit pricing or purchases of approved products, any of which could materially harm our business.

Lawsuits, publicity campaigns or other negative publicity may adversely affect the degree of market acceptance of, and thereby limit the demand for, TPOXX® and our biodefense product candidates. In such event, our ability to market and sell such products may be hindered, the commercial success of TPOXX® and other products we develop may be harmed and we may need to expend time, attention and resources addressing such legal or publicity issues, thereby reducing our revenues and having a material adverse impact on us.

A U.S. Government shutdown could negatively impact our business and liquidity

Each year, the U.S. Congress must pass all spending bills in the federal budget. If any such spending bill is not timely passed, a government shutdown may close many federally run operations, and halt work for federal employees unless they are considered essential or such work is separately funded by industry. If a government shutdown were to occur, we could experience a delay in contract funding decisions by the government. Additionally, we could be materially and permanently harmed by any prolonged government shutdown.

Risks Related to Sales of Biodefense Products to the U.S. Government

Our business could be adversely affected by a negative audit by the U.S. government.

U.S. government agencies such as the Defense Contract Audit Agency (the “DCAA”), routinely audit and investigate government contractors. These agencies review a contractor’s performance under its contracts and grants, cost structure, and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards.

The DCAA also reviews the adequacy of, and a contractor’s compliance with, its internal control systems and policies, including the contractor’s purchasing, property, estimating, compensation and management information systems. Any cost found to be improperly allocated to a specific contract will not be reimbursed, and such costs already reimbursed must be refunded. If an audit uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including:

termination of contracts;

forfeiture of profits;

suspension of payments;

fines; and

suspension, debarment or prohibition from doing business with the U.S. government.

Such actions would also negatively affect our reputation.


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Laws and regulations affecting government contracts and grants might make it more costly and difficult for us to conduct our business.

We must comply with numerous laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of government contracts and grants, which can make it more difficult for us to retain our rights under these contracts. These laws and regulations affect how we do business with federal, state and local governmental agencies. Among the most significant government contracting regulations that affect our business are:

the Federal Acquisition Regulation and other agency-specific regulations supplemental to the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which comprehensively regulate the procurement, formation, administration and performance of government contracts;

the business ethics and public integrity obligations, which govern conflicts of interest and the hiring of
former government employees, restrict the granting of gratuities and funding of lobbying activities and incorporate other requirements such as the Anti-Kickback Act and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act;

export and import control laws and regulations; and

laws, regulations and executive orders restricting the use and dissemination of information classified for national security purposes and the exportation of certain products and technical data.

Risks Related to Regulatory Approvals

If we are not able to obtain regulatory approvals for certain additional indications or formulations of TPOXX® from the FDA, we may not be able to realize the full benefits of any BARDA contracts and may not be able to commercialize such formulations or indications other than through sales to BARDA, and our ability to generate revenue could be materially impaired.

The development and full commercialization of additional indications or formulations of TPOXX® in the U.S., including the testing, manufacture, safety, efficacy, recordkeeping, labeling, storage, approval, advertising, promotion, sale and distribution, are subject to comprehensive regulation by the FDA and other regulatory agencies in the United States and by comparable authorities in other countries and jurisdictions. We could fail to achieve FDA or other regulatory approval of certain indications or formulations of TPOXX®, or there could be delays in such approval of TPOXX®, or the approved version of TPOXX® may differ from expectations. Failure to obtain regulatory approval of certain indications or formulations for TPOXX® may prevent us from fully commercializing TPOXX® in the United States other than through sales to BARDA under Project BioShield or from commercializing TPOXX® in other countries at all, and delays or alterations to regulatory applications could also have a material adverse effect on the Company.

Failure to obtain regulatory approval in international jurisdictions could prevent us from marketing our products abroad.

To market our products in the European Union and many other foreign jurisdictions, we may need to obtain separate regulatory approvals and comply with numerous and varying regulatory requirements. The approval procedure varies among countries and can involve additional testing. The time required to obtain approval may differ from that required to obtain FDA approval.

The foreign regulatory approval process may include all of the risks associated with obtaining FDA approval. We may not obtain foreign regulatory approvals on a timely basis, if at all. Approval by FDA does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other countries or jurisdictions, and approval by one foreign regulatory authority does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other foreign countries or jurisdictions or by the FDA. In addition, failure to obtain approval in one jurisdiction may impact our ability to obtain approval elsewhere. We may not be able to file for regulatory approvals and may not receive necessary approvals to commercialize our products in any non-U.S. market. If we fail to obtain the non-U.S. approvals required to market our product candidates outside the United States or if we fail to comply with applicable non-U.S. regulatory requirements, our target market may be reduced and our ability to realize the full market potential of our product candidates may be harmed and our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be adversely affected.

Risks Related to Commercial Activities

Because we must obtain regulatory clearance or otherwise operate under strict legal requirements in order to manufacture and market our products in the U.S., we cannot predict whether or when we will be permitted to commercialize our products other than the oral formulation of TPOXX® for smallpox antiviral treatment.

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While we have received FDA approval for oral TPOXX® for use in smallpox treatment, we have not received FDA approval for the IV formulation of TPOXX® or any other indications for TPOXX®. FDA approval is limited only to those conditions for which a product is demonstrated through clinical trials to be safe and efficacious as set forth in its approved product label. We cannot ensure that the IV formulation of TPOXX® or any other compound developed by us, alone or with others, will prove to be safe and efficacious in pre-clinical or clinical trials or animal efficacy studies, or that oral TPOXX® will prove to be safe and efficacious in pre-clinical or clinical trials or animal efficacy studies for other indications, nor whether all of the applicable regulatory requirements needed to receive full marketing clearance for other indications or other formulations will be met.

Our ability to grow our business may depend in part on our ability to achieve sales of TPOXX® to customers other than the U.S. government.

An element of our business strategy is to sell TPOXX® to customers other than the U.S. government. These potential customers include foreign governments, as well as state and local governments, non-governmental organizations focused on global health like the World Health Organization, health care institutions like hospitals (domestic and foreign) and certain large business organizations interested in protecting their employees against global threats and protecting first responders in cases of emergencies.

To the extent we seek such non-government sales in the U.S., we will need to meet additional regulatory requirements in light of the current labeling approved by the FDA for the Strategic Stockpile only.

The market for sales of TPOXX® to customers other than the U.S. government is undeveloped, and we may not be successful in generating meaningful sales of TPOXX®, if any, to these potential customers.

If we fail to increase our sales of TPOXX® to customers other than the U.S. government, our business and opportunities for growth could be limited.

If we are unable to expand our internal sales and marketing capabilities or enter into agreements with third parties with expertise in sales and marketing, we may be unable to generate cash flows from product sales to customers other than the U.S. government.

To achieve commercial success for any approved product, we may need to enhance our own sales and marketing capabilities, enter into collaborations with third parties able to perform these services or outsource these functions to third parties.

We currently employ a small, targeted group to support development and business activities related to TPOXX®. We plan to continue to do so and expect that we will use a similar approach for sales to the U.S. government of any other biodefense product candidates that we may successfully develop. If we are unable to adequately support our development and business activities, we may be unable to expand our sales of TPOXX® or other product candidates, which could have an adverse effect on our growth.

We may be required to perform additional clinical trials or change the labeling of TPOXX® if we or others identify side effects after we are on the market, which could harm future sales of such product.

If we or others identify side effects of any approved product, or if manufacturing problems occur:

regulatory approval may be withdrawn;

reformulation of our products, additional clinical trials or other testing or changes in labeling of our products may be required;

changes to or re-approvals of manufacturing facilities used by SIGA may be required;

sales of the affected products may drop significantly;

our reputation in the marketplace may suffer; and

lawsuits, including class action suits, may be brought against us.

Any of the above occurrences could harm or prevent future sales of the affected product or could increase the costs and expenses of commercializing and marketing these products.


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The biopharmaceutical market in which we compete and will compete is highly competitive.

The biopharmaceutical industry is characterized by rapid and significant technological change. Our success will depend on our ability to develop and apply our technologies in the design and development of our product candidates and to establish and maintain a market for our product candidates. In addition, there are many companies, both public and private, including major pharmaceutical and chemical companies, specialized biotechnology firms, universities and other research institutions engaged in developing pharmaceutical and biotechnology products. Many of these companies have substantially greater financial, technical, research and development resources, and human resources than us. Competitors may develop products or other technologies that are more effective than any that are being developed by us or may obtain FDA approval for products more rapidly than us. If we commence commercial sales of products, we still must compete in the manufacturing and marketing of such products, areas in which it is very difficult to succeed and in which we have limited experience and in which we are partially dependent on third parties. Many potential competitors have manufacturing facilities and established marketing capabilities that would enable such companies to market competing products through existing channels of distribution which could provide a substantial advantage.

Product liability lawsuits could cause us to incur liabilities, which could be substantial, and require us to limit commercialization of any products that we may develop.

We face an inherent business risk related to the sale of TPOXX® and any other products that we successfully develop and the testing of our product candidates in clinical trials.

TPOXX® is currently identified as a covered countermeasure under the PREP Act declaration issued in October 2008, as amended, which provides us with substantial immunity with respect to the manufacture, administration or use of TPOXX®. Under our BARDA Contracts, the U.S. government should indemnify us against claims by third parties for death, personal injury and other damages related to TPOXX®, including reasonable litigation and settlement costs, to the extent that the claim or loss results from specified risks not covered by insurance or caused by our grossly negligent or criminal behavior. The collection process under the PREP Act can be lengthy and complicated, and there is no guarantee that we will be able to recover these amounts from the U.S. government.

If we cannot successfully defend ourselves against future claims that our product or product candidates caused injuries and we are not entitled to or able to obtain indemnity by the U.S. government with respect to such claims, or if the U.S. government does not honor its indemnification obligations, we may incur liabilities, which could be substantial. Regardless of merit or eventual outcome, product liability claims may result in:

decreased demand for any product candidate or product that we may develop;

injury to our reputation;

withdrawal of a product from the market;

costs and management time and focus to defend the related litigation;

substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;

loss of revenue;

harm to our reputation; and

the inability to commercialize any products that we may develop.

We currently have product liability insurance with coverage up to a $10 million annual aggregate limit and a $10 million per occurrence limit. The amount of insurance that we currently hold may not be adequate to cover all liabilities that may occur. Product liability insurance is difficult to obtain and increasingly expensive. We may not be able to maintain insurance coverage at a reasonable cost and we may not be able to maintain or obtain insurance coverage that will be adequate to satisfy any liability that may arise.

Additionally, a successful product liability claim or series of claims brought against us could cause our stock price to fall, could decrease our financial resources and materially exhaust our existing insurance or limit our ability to obtain insurance going forward, all of which would materially adversely affect our business.


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If we seek to sell TPOXX® to non-government customers, healthcare reform and controls on healthcare spending may limit the price we charge for our products and the amounts that we can sell.

There have been a number of legislative and regulatory proposals in the United States to change the health care system in ways that could affect our ability to sell our products profitably if we seek to sell TPOXX® to non-government customers. One enacted proposal, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively, the “Healthcare Reform Act”), substantially changed the way healthcare is financed by both governmental and private insurers and could have a substantial effect on the pharmaceutical industry. The Healthcare Reform Act contains a number of provisions, including those governing enrollment in federal healthcare programs like Medicare, reimbursement changes and rules protecting against fraud and abuse, that will change existing healthcare programs and will result in the development of new programs, including Medicare payment for performance initiatives and improvements to the physician quality reporting system and feedback program. If we obtain marketing approval sale of TPOXX® beyond the Strategic Stockpile, it is possible that some of our revenue may be derived from governmental healthcare programs, including Medicare. Furthermore, beginning in 2011, the Healthcare Reform Act imposed a non-deductible excise tax on pharmaceutical manufacturers or importers who sell “branded prescription drugs,” which includes innovator drugs and biologics (excluding orphan drugs or generics) to U.S. government programs. The Healthcare Reform Act and other healthcare reform measures that may be adopted in the future could have an adverse effect on our industry generally and potential future sales and profitability of our current or future products specifically.

Laws and regulations governing international operations may preclude us from developing, manufacturing and selling certain product candidates outside of the United States and require us to revise and implement costly compliance programs.

If we expand our operations outside of the United States, we must comply with numerous laws and regulations relating to business operations in each jurisdiction in which we plan to operate. The creation and implementation of international business practices and compliance programs may be costly and such programs can be difficult to enforce, particularly where reliance on third parties is required.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, prohibits any U.S. individual or business from paying, offering, or authorizing payment or offering of anything of value, directly or indirectly, to any foreign official, political party or candidate for the purpose of influencing any act or decision of the foreign entity in order to assist the individual or business in obtaining or retaining business. The FCPA also obligates companies whose securities are listed in the United States to comply with certain accounting provisions requiring the Company to maintain books and records that accurately and fairly reflect all transactions of the corporation, including international subsidiaries, and to devise and maintain an adequate system of internal accounting controls for international operations. The anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA are enforced primarily by the U.S. Department of Justice. The SEC is involved with enforcement of the books and records provisions of the FCPA.

If we expand our operations outside of the U.S., compliance with the FCPA may be expensive and can be difficult, particularly in countries in which corruption is a recognized problem. In addition, the FCPA presents particular challenges in the pharmaceutical industry, because, in many countries, hospitals are operated by the government, and doctors and other hospital employees are considered foreign officials. Certain payments to hospitals in connection with clinical studies and other work have been deemed to be improper payments to government officials and have led to FCPA enforcement actions. In addition, biodefense companies like SIGA often sell their products directly to foreign governments.

Various laws, regulations and executive orders also restrict the use and dissemination outside of the United States, or the sharing with certain non-U.S. nationals, of information classified for national security purposes, as well as certain products and technical data relating to those products. If we expand our presence outside of the United States, it may require us to dedicate additional resources to compliance with these laws, and these laws may preclude us from developing, manufacturing, or selling certain products and product candidates outside of the United States, which could limit our growth potential and increase our development costs.

The failure to comply with laws governing international business practices may result in substantial penalties, including suspension or debarment from government contracting. Violation of the FCPA can result in significant civil and criminal penalties that can be levied on the Company and its executives.

Indictment alone under the FCPA can lead to suspension of the right to do business with the U.S. government until the pending claims are resolved. Conviction of a violation of the FCPA can result in long-term disqualification as a government contractor. The termination of a government contract or relationship as a result of our failure to satisfy any of our obligations under laws governing international business practices could have a material negative impact on our operations and harm our reputation and ability to procure government contracts. The SEC also may suspend or bar issuers from trading securities on United States exchanges for violations of the FCPA’s accounting provisions.

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Other countries such as the UK have anti-bribery laws similar to or more expansive in scope than the FCPA which may be applicable to our operations if we expand outside the U.S.

Risks Related to Product Development

Growth of our business may be impacted significantly by our success in completing development and commercialization of drug candidates, or additional indications for TPOXX®. If we are unable to commercialize new drug candidates or additional indications, or experience significant delays in doing so, our business may be materially harmed.

We have invested a substantial amount of our efforts and financial resources in the development of our drug candidates. Our ability to generate near-term cash flows is primarily dependent on the success of our smallpox antiviral drug TPOXX®, which has only been approved by the FDA in oral form. The commercial success of our current and future drug candidates, or additional indications for TPOXX®, will depend on many factors, including:

successful development, formulation and cGMP scale-up of drug manufacturing that meets FDA requirements;

successful development of animal models;

successful completion of non-clinical development, including studies in approved animal models;

our ability to pay the expense of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing patent claims and other intellectual property rights;

successful completion of clinical trials;

receipt of marketing approvals from FDA for IV TPOXX® and similar foreign regulatory authorities;

establishing arrangements on reasonable terms with suppliers and contract manufacturers;

manufacturing stable commercial supplies of drug candidates, including availability of raw materials;

launching commercial sales of the product, whether alone or in collaboration with others; and

acceptance of the product by potential government customers, public health experts, physicians, patients, healthcare payors and others in the medical community.

We may rely on FDA regulations known as the “Animal Rule” to obtain approval for most of our biodefense drug candidates. The Animal Rule permits the use of animal efficacy studies together with human clinical safety trials to support an application for marketing approval. These regulations are relied upon only occasionally. It is possible that results from these animal efficacy studies may not be predictive of the actual efficacy of our drug candidates in humans. If we are not successful in completing the development and commercialization of our drug candidates, whether due to our efforts or due to concerns raised by our governmental regulators or customers, our business could be materially adversely harmed.

We may not be able to fully commercialize the IV formulation of TPOXX®, or other additional indications for TPOXX®, if our clinical trials do not demonstrate adequate safety or our animal studies do not demonstrate adequate efficacy.

Before obtaining regulatory approval for the sale of our drug candidates, extensive development is required. The goal of development is to use clinical studies to demonstrate the safety of our drug candidates and animal trials to demonstrate the efficacy of our drug candidates. Clinical trials and animal studies, and related work, are expensive, difficult to design and implement, can take many years to complete and are uncertain as to outcome. Success in pre-clinical testing and early clinical trials does not ensure that later clinical trials or animal efficacy studies will be successful, and interim results of a clinical trial or animal efficacy study do not necessarily predict final results.

A failure of one or more of our clinical trials or animal efficacy studies can occur at any stage of development. We may experience numerous unforeseen events during, or as a result of, pre-clinical testing and the clinical trial or animal efficacy study process that could delay or prevent our ability to receive regulatory approval or commercialize our drug candidates, including:


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regulators or institutional review boards may not authorize us to commence a clinical trial or conduct a clinical trial at a prospective trial site;

we may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional pre-clinical testing or clinical trials, or we may abandon projects that we expect to be promising, if our pre-clinical tests, clinical trials or animal efficacy studies produce negative or inconclusive results;

we might have to suspend or terminate our clinical trials if the participants are being exposed to unacceptable health risks;

regulators or institutional review boards may require that we hold, suspend or terminate clinical development for various reasons, including noncompliance with regulatory requirements;

the cost of our clinical trials could escalate and become cost prohibitive;

our governmental regulators may impose requirements on clinical trials, pre-clinical trials or animal efficacy studies that we cannot meet or that may prohibit or limit our ability to perform or complete the necessary testing in order to obtain regulatory approval;

any regulatory approval we ultimately obtain may be limited or subject to restrictions or post-approval commitments that render the product not commercially viable;

we may not be successful in recruiting a sufficient number of qualifying subjects for our clinical trials; or

the effects of our drug candidates may not be the desired effects or may include undesirable side effects or the drug candidates may have other unexpected characteristics;

the costs, regulations, or challenges associated with animal studies may increase and make our studies more difficult.

IV TPOXX® is currently in product development and there can be no assurance of successful commercialization beyond the 2018 BARDA contract.

The fact that the FDA has approved the oral formulation of TPOXX® does not guarantee that our approach to drug development will be effective or will result in the successful commercialization of any other drug, the IV formulation of TPOXX® or any new indication of TPOXX®. We cannot predict with certainty whether any other drug candidate or expanded indication resulting from our research and development efforts will be approved by the FDA.

All of our potential drug candidates are prone to the risks of failure inherent in pharmaceutical product development, including the possibility that our drug candidates will not or cannot:

be shown to be safe, non-toxic and effective;

otherwise meet applicable regulatory standards;

receive the necessary regulatory approvals;

develop into commercially viable drugs;

be manufactured or produced economically and on a large scale;

be successfully marketed;

be paid for by governmental procurers or be reimbursed by governmental or private insurers; or

achieve customer acceptance.

In addition, third parties may seek to preclude us from marketing our drugs through enforcement of their proprietary or intellectual property rights that we are not aware of, or third parties may succeed in marketing equivalent or superior drug products that do not infringe our intellectual property. Our failure to develop safe, commercially viable future drug candidates or obtain approval

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for expanded indications and formulations of TPOXX® would have a material adverse effect on our ability to grow our business, and impair our financial condition and operations.

Risks Related to Our Dependence on Third Parties

If third parties on whom we rely for manufacturing and raw materials of TPOXX®, and managing our inventory, do not perform as contractually required or as we expect, we may not be able to successfully satisfy our obligations under the 2018 BARDA Contract and our business would suffer.

We currently rely on third-party manufacturers and service providers to provide raw materials and manufacture TPOXX®. Under the 2018 BARDA Contract, we are responsible for the performance of these third-party contracts, and our contracts with these third parties give us certain supervisory and quality control rights, but we do not exercise day-to-day control over their activities.

Additionally, we may rely on a third party provider, or multiple providers, to store a portion of the stockpile of IV TPOXX® under the 2018 BARDA Contract, entrusting this vendor with the care and handling of a substantial portion of our inventory of IV TPOXX®.
    
If a third party provider fails to comply with applicable laws and regulations, fails to meet expected deadlines, experiences shortages or delays, or otherwise does not carry out its contractual duties to us, or encounters physical damage or natural disaster at its facilities, our ability to meet our obligations under the 2018 BARDA Contract could be significantly impaired. We do not currently have the internal capacity to perform these important functions, and we may not be able to maintain commercial arrangements for these services on reasonable terms.

Our reliance on third parties that we do not control does not relieve us of the responsibilities and requirements imposed by the 2018 BARDA Contract. Third parties may not complete activities on schedule, or may not conduct trials in accordance with regulatory requirements or our stated protocols. The failure of these third parties to carry out their obligations could delay or prevent the development, approval and commercialization of IV TPOXX® or other drug candidates.

Risks Related to Manufacturing and Manufacturing Facilities

Problems related to large-scale commercial manufacturing could cause us to delay product launches, an increase in costs or shortages of products.

Manufacturing API and finished drug products, especially in large quantities, is complex. Our drug candidates require several manufacturing steps at multiple facilities, and may involve complex techniques to assure quality and sufficient quantity, especially as the manufacturing scale increases. Our products must be made consistently and in compliance with a clearly defined manufacturing process. Accordingly, it is essential to be able to validate and control the manufacturing process to assure that it is reproducible. Slight deviations anywhere in the manufacturing process, including obtaining materials, filling, labeling, packaging, storage, shipping, quality control and testing, some of which all pharmaceutical companies, including SIGA, experience from time to time, may result in lot failures, delay in the release of lots, product recalls or spoilage. Success rates can vary dramatically at different stages of the manufacturing process, which can lower yields and increase costs. We may experience deviations in the manufacturing process that may take significant time and resources to resolve and, if unresolved, may affect manufacturing output and/or cause us to fail to satisfy contractual commitments, lead to delays in our clinical trials or result in litigation or regulatory action. Such actions would hinder our ability to meet contractual obligations and could cause material adverse consequences for our business.

If third parties do not manufacture our drug candidates or products in sufficient quantities and at an acceptable cost or in compliance with regulatory or contractual requirements and specifications, the fulfillment of contractual requirements under the 2018 BARDA contract, or any other procurement contract, or the development of our drug candidates could be delayed, prevented or impaired.

We currently rely on third parties to manufacture drug candidates, including TPOXX®. Any significant delay in obtaining adequate supplies of our drug candidates could adversely affect our ability to develop drug candidates or perform commercial contracts. If our contract manufacturers are unable to generate enough materials to meet commercial obligations or satisfy clinical needs, the success of drug products may be jeopardized. Our current and anticipated future dependence upon others for the manufacture of our drug candidates may adversely affect our ability to develop drug candidates and perform on commercial contracts on a timely and competitive basis. If our third party manufacturers’ production processes malfunction or contaminate

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our drug supplies during manufacturing, we may incur significant inventory loss that may not be covered by our contractual provisions or insurance policies.

We currently rely on third parties to demonstrate regulatory compliance, for regulatory and science support and for quality assurance with respect to the drug candidates manufactured for us. We intend to continue to rely on these third parties for these purposes with respect to production of commercial supplies of drugs that we successfully develop. Manufacturers are subject to ongoing, periodic, unannounced inspection by the FDA and corresponding state and foreign agencies or their designees to ensure strict compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

We cannot be certain that our present or future manufacturers will be able to comply with these regulations and other FDA regulatory requirements or similar regulatory requirements outside the U.S. Our contracts and grants call for compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements, however, we do not control third-party manufacturers and their methods for ensuring adherence to regulatory and legal standards. If we or these third parties fail to comply with applicable regulations, sanctions could be imposed on us which could significantly delay and adversely affect supplies of our drug candidates.

Our activities may involve hazardous materials, use of which may subject us to environmental regulatory liabilities.

Our biopharmaceutical research and development sometimes may involve the use of hazardous and radioactive materials and generation of biological waste. We are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the use, manufacture, storage, handling and disposal of these materials and certain waste products. Although we believe that our CMO's safety procedures for handling and disposing of these materials comply with legally prescribed standards, the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials cannot be completely eliminated. In the event of an accident, we could be held liable for damages, and this liability could exceed our resources. We use through third parties, for example, small amounts of radioactive isotopes commonly used in pharmaceutical research, which are stored, used and disposed of in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. Our general liability policy provides coverage up to annual aggregate limits of $2 million and coverage of $2 million per occurrence.

We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable environmental laws and regulations and currently do not expect to make material additional capital expenditures for environmental control facilities in the near term. However, we may have to incur significant costs to comply with current or future environmental laws and regulations.

Risks Related to Our Business

We could incur net losses in the future if options are not exercised under the 2018 BARDA Contract.

    While our current cash position is strong, our ability to continue to fund future operations will be substantially impacted by cash flows from the 2018 BARDA Contract, which may not be sufficient if BARDA elects, in its sole discretion, not to exercise some or all of the options under the 2018 BARDA Contract. Given the nature of option-based government contracts, we cannot guarantee that we can sustain or enhance our current level of operations. Cash flows could fluctuate significantly and could be delayed from one quarter to another based on several factors. As such, if cash flows from the 2018 BARDA Contract are different from expectations, or if operating expenses or other expenses exceed our expectations or cannot be adjusted accordingly, then our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

Future acquisitions, strategic investments, partnerships or alliances could be difficult to identify and integrate, divert the attention of management, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

We may in the future seek to acquire or invest in businesses, products or technologies that we believe could complement or expand our services, enhance our technical capabilities or otherwise offer growth opportunities. The pursuit of potential acquisitions may divert the attention of management and cause us to incur various expenses in identifying, investigating and pursuing businesses. In addition, we may not be able to find and identify desirable acquisition targets or be successful in entering into an agreement with any particular target or consummating any such agreement. Even if we do consummate an agreement, we may not be able to integrate successfully the acquired personnel, operations and technologies, or effectively manage the combined business following the acquisitions. Acquisitions could also result in dilutive issuances of equity securities or the issuance of debt, which could adversely affect our operating results. In addition, if an acquired business fails to meet our expectations, our operating results, business and financial condition may suffer.


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Our business and operations would suffer in the event of computer system failures, cyber-attacks or a deficiency in our cyber-security.
    
Despite the implementation of security measures, our internal computer systems, and those of third parties on which we rely, are vulnerable to damage from computer viruses, malware, natural disasters, terrorism, war, telecommunication and electrical failures, cyber-attacks or cyber-intrusions over the Internet, attachments to emails, persons inside our organization or persons with access to systems inside our organization. The risk of a security breach or disruption, particularly through cyber-attacks or cyber-intrusion, including by computer hackers, foreign governments and cyber terrorists, has generally increased as the number, intensity and sophistication of attempted attacks and intrusions from around the world have increased. If such an event were to occur and cause interruptions in our operations, it could result in a material disruption of our drug development programs. For example, the loss of clinical trial data from completed or ongoing or planned clinical trials could result in delays in our regulatory approval efforts and significantly increase our costs to recover or reproduce the data. Also, confidential patient and other information may be compromised in a cyber-attack or cyber-intrusion. To the extent that any disruption or security breach was to result in a loss of or damage to our data or applications, or inappropriate disclosure of confidential or proprietary information, we could incur material legal claims and liability, damage to our reputation, and the further development of our drug candidates could be delayed.

The loss of key personnel or our ability to recruit or retain qualified personnel could adversely affect our results of operations.

We rely upon the ability, expertise, judgment, discretion, integrity and good faith of our senior management team. Our success is dependent upon our personnel and our ability to recruit and train high quality employees. We must continue to recruit, retain and motivate management and other employees sufficient to maintain our current business and support our projected growth. The loss of services of any of our key management could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our future success depends on our ability to retain our chief executive officer and other key executives and to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel. The loss of the services of any key executive might impede the achievement of our research, development and commercial objectives. Replacing key employees may be difficult and time-consuming because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the skills and experiences required to develop, gain regulatory approval of and commercialize our product candidates successfully. We generally do not maintain key person life insurance to cover the loss of any of our employees. Recruiting and retaining qualified scientific personnel, clinical personnel and business development personnel will also be critical to our success. We may not be able to attract and retain these personnel on acceptable terms, if at all, given the competition among numerous pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for similar personnel. We also experience competition for the hiring of scientific and clinical personnel from other companies, universities and research institutions. In addition, we rely on consultants and advisors, including scientific and clinical advisors, to assist us in formulating our research and development, regulatory and commercialization strategy. Our consultants and advisors may be employed by employers other than us and may have commitments under consulting or advisory contracts with other entities that may limit their availability to us.

We may have difficulty managing our growth.

Potential future growth could place a significant strain on our management and operations. Our ability to manage any future growth will depend upon our ability to broaden our management team and our ability to attract, hire and retain skilled employees. Our success will also depend on the ability of our officers and key employees to continue to implement and improve our operational and other systems and to hire, train and manage our employees.

Our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards may be limited.

As of December 31, 2018, we had federal net operating loss carryforwards, or NOLs, of $40.3 million to offset future taxable income. The remaining NOLs expire in 2036, if not utilized. Under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, substantial changes in our ownership, in certain circumstances, will limit the amount of NOLs that can be utilized annually in the future to offset taxable income. In particular, section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code imposes a limitation on a company’s ability to use NOLs if the company experiences a more-than-50% ownership change over a three-year period. If we are limited in our ability to use our NOLs in future years in which we have taxable income, we may be required to pay more taxes than if we were able to utilize our NOLs fully.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

Our ability to compete may decrease if we do not adequately protect our intellectual property rights.


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Our commercial success will depend in part on our ability to obtain and maintain patent protection for our proprietary technologies, drug targets and potential products and to preserve our trade secrets and trademark rights. Because of the substantial length of time and expense associated with bringing potential products through the development and regulatory clearance processes to reach the marketplace, the pharmaceutical industry places considerable importance on obtaining patent and trade secret protection. The patent positions of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies can be highly uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions. No consistent policy regarding the breadth of claims allowed in biotechnology patents worldwide has emerged to date. Accordingly, we cannot predict the type and breadth of claims allowed in patents covering our products.

SIGA exclusively owns its key patent portfolios, which relate to its leading drug candidate TPOXX® (also known as ST-246, tecovirimat). As of February 28, 2019, the TPOXX® patent portfolio has seven patent families consisting of 21 U.S. utility patents, 57 issued foreign patents, five U.S. utility patent applications, and 41 foreign patent applications.

We also rely on trade secrets, know-how, continuing technological innovation and licensing opportunities. In an effort to maintain the confidentiality and ownership of trade secrets and proprietary information, we require our employees, consultants and some collaborators to execute confidentiality and invention assignment agreements upon commencement of a relationship with us. These agreements may not provide meaningful protection for our trade secrets, confidential information or inventions in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of such information, and adequate remedies may not exist in the event of such unauthorized use or disclosure.

If our technologies are alleged or found to infringe the patents or proprietary rights of others, we may be sued, we may have to pay damages or be barred from pursuing a technology, or we may have to license those rights and pay royalties to or from others on unfavorable terms. If we are sued, even if we prevail, such litigation may be costly.

Our commercial success will depend significantly on our ability to operate without infringing the patents or proprietary rights of third parties. Our technologies, or the technologies of third parties on which we may depend, may infringe the patents or proprietary rights of others. If there is an adverse outcome in any dispute concerning rights to these technologies, then we could be subject to significant liability, required to license disputed rights from or to other parties and/or required to cease using a technology necessary to carry out our research, development and commercialization activities.

If our patents are challenged and found to be invalid or unenforceable, the value of our products could be harmed, and we could be subject to competition earlier than we anticipated.

The costs to establish or defend against claims of infringement or interference with patents or other proprietary rights can be expensive and time-consuming, even if the outcome is favorable. An outcome of any patent or proprietary rights administrative proceeding or litigation that is unfavorable to us may have a material adverse effect on us. We could incur substantial costs if we are required to defend ourselves in suits brought by third parties or if we initiate such suits. We may not have sufficient funds or resources in the event of litigation. Additionally, we may not prevail in any such action and such litigation often takes years to resolve creating business uncertainty if we are not able to resolve it quickly.

Any dispute resulting from claims based on patents and proprietary rights could result in a significant reduction in the coverage of the patents or proprietary rights owned, optioned by or licensed to us and limit our ability to obtain meaningful protection for our rights. If patents are issued to third parties that contain competitive or conflicting claims, we may be legally prohibited from researching, developing or commercializing potential products or be required to obtain licenses to these patents that carry royalty payments or to develop or obtain alternative technology. We may be legally prohibited from using technology owned by others, may not be able to obtain any license to the patents or technologies of third parties on acceptable terms, if at all, or may not be able to obtain or develop alternative technologies.

Furthermore, like many biopharmaceutical companies, we may from time to time hire scientific personnel formerly employed by other companies involved in one or more areas similar to the activities conducted by us. It is possible that we and/or these individuals may be subject to allegations of trade secret misappropriation or other similar claims as a result of their prior affiliations.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Additional Financing

We may need additional funding, which may not be available to us, and which may force us to delay, reduce or eliminate any of our product development programs or commercial efforts.

While we have raised funds through credit facilities and the issuance of new equity or the exercise of options or warrants in the past, there is no guarantee that we will continue to be successful in raising such funds should we need to seek to do so. If

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we are unable to raise additional funds, we could be forced to discontinue, cease or limit certain operations and equity investors could experience significant or total losses of their investments. Our cash flows may fall short of our projections or be delayed, or our expenses may increase, which could result in our capital being consumed significantly faster than anticipated.

Although our current cash position is strong, we may require additional financing and we may not be able to raise additional funds. If we are able to obtain additional financing through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, such sales may contain terms, such as liquidation and other preferences that are not favorable to us or our stockholders. If we raise additional funds through collaboration and licensing arrangements with third parties, it may be necessary to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies or product candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. Debt financing arrangements, if available, may require us to pledge certain assets or enter into covenants that would restrict our business activities or our ability to incur further indebtedness and may be at interest rates and contain other terms that are not favorable to our stockholders.

Indebtedness may make it more difficult to obtain additional financing or reduce our flexibility to act in our best interests, and default on our indebtedness would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The level of our indebtedness under our $80.0 million loan and security agreement dated September 2, 2016 (as amended from time to time, the "Loan Agreement") with OCM Strategic Credit SIGTEC Holdings, LLC ("Lender), could affect us by: making it more difficult to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements or other purposes; shortening the duration of available revolving credit because lenders may seek to avoid conflicting maturity dates; constraining our ability to react quickly in an unfavorable economic climate or to changes in our business or the pharmaceutical industry; or potentially requiring the dedication of substantial amounts to service the repayment of outstanding debt, including periodic interest payments, thereby reducing the amount of cash available for other purposes. In addition, the Loan Agreement contains customary covenants which could impact our ability to obtain additional financing and restrict our flexibility in carrying out our business strategy.

Under the Loan Agreement, we are obligated to make periodic interest payments on the outstanding principal amount. Any accrued and unpaid interest or unpaid principal will be due on the maturity date of the loan (November 16, 2020). If we do not generate sufficient operating cash flows to fund these payments or obtain additional funding from external sources at acceptable terms, we may not have sufficient funds to satisfy our principal and interest payment obligations when those obligations are due, which would place us into default under the terms of the Loan Agreement (as further described below).

The Loan Agreement contains customary representations and warranties and customary affirmative and negative covenants. These covenants, among other things, require a minimum cash balance throughout the term of the loan under the Loan Agreement and the achievement of regulatory milestones by certain dates, and contain certain limitations on the ability of the Company to incur unreimbursed research and development expenditures over a certain threshold, make capital expenditures over a certain threshold, incur indebtedness, dispose of assets outside of the ordinary course of business and enter into certain merger or consolidation transactions. These covenants could impact our ability to obtain additional financing and restrict our flexibility in carrying out our business strategy.

The Loan Agreement includes customary events of default, including, among others: (i) non-payment of amounts due thereunder, (ii) the material inaccuracy of representations or warranties made thereunder, (iii) non-compliance with covenants thereunder, (iv) non-payment of amounts due under, or the acceleration of, other material indebtedness of the Company and (v) bankruptcy or insolvency events. Such default would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Upon the occurrence and during the continuance of an event of default under the Loan Agreement, the interest rate may increase by 2.00% per annum above the rate of interest otherwise in effect, and the Lender would be entitled to accelerate the maturity of the Company’s outstanding obligations thereunder. In addition, our indebtedness under the Loan Agreement is secured by a first priority lien on all of our existing and after-acquired property, including intellectual property. If we default on our obligations under the Loan Agreement, the Lender could foreclose on our assets.

We may issue additional debt or incur other types of indebtedness in the future, subject to compliance with the terms of the Loan Agreement, and such additional indebtedness may carry with it similar risks.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

Our stock price is, and we expect it to remain, volatile, which could limit investors’ ability to sell stock at a profit.

The volatile price of our stock makes it difficult for investors to predict the value of their investments, to sell shares at a profit at any given time, or to plan purchases and sales in advance. A variety of factors may affect the market price of our common stock. These include, but are not limited to:

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publicity regarding actual or potential clinical or animal test results relating to products under development by our competitors or us;

initiating, completing or analyzing, or a delay or failure in initiating, completing or analyzing, pre-clinical or clinical trials or animal trials or the design or results of these trials for products in development;

achievement or rejection of regulatory approvals for products in development by our competitors or us;

announcements of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors or us;

developments concerning our collaborations and supply chain;

regulatory developments in the United States and foreign countries;

economic or other crises and other external factors;

period-to-period fluctuations in our revenues and other results of operations;

changes in financial estimates by securities analysts; or

publicity or activity involving possible future acquisitions, strategic investments, partnerships or alliances.

Additionally, because the volume of trading in our stock fluctuates significantly at times, any information about us in the media or public domain may result in significant volatility in our stock price.

We will not be able to control many of these factors, and we believe that period-to-period comparisons of our financial results will not necessarily be indicative of our future performance.

In addition, the stock market in general, and the market for biotechnology companies in particular, has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that may have been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market and industry factors may seriously harm the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance.

If securities or industry analysts publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will depend in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who may cover us downgrade our common stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our common stock price would likely decline.

A future issuance of preferred stock may adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

Our certificate of incorporation allows our Board of Directors to issue up to 20,000,000 shares of preferred stock and to fix the voting powers, designations, preferences, rights and qualifications, limitations or restrictions of these shares without any further vote or action by the stockholders. The rights of the holders of common stock will be subject to, and could be adversely affected by, the rights of the holders of any preferred stock that we may issue in the future. The issuance of preferred stock, while providing desirable flexibility in connection with our future activities, could also have the effect of making it more difficult for a third party to acquire a majority of our outstanding voting stock, thereby delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control.

Concentration of ownership of our capital stock could delay or prevent a change of control.

Our directors, executive officers and principal stockholders beneficially own a significant percentage of our common stock. As a result, these stockholders, if acting together, have the ability to influence the outcome of corporate actions requiring stockholder approval. Additionally, this concentration of ownership may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control of SIGA. As of the most recent available information, directors, executive officers and principal stockholders beneficially owned approximately 33% of our outstanding common stock. In addition to owning common stock of the Company, directors and certain executive officers have the right to acquire additional stock through the exercise or conversion of certain securities.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None.

Item 2. Properties
 
Our headquarters are located in New York, NY and our research and development facilities are located in Corvallis, Oregon. In January 2013, we entered into a sublease for approximately 6,676 square feet with a related party to sublet office space in a New York, NY location to serve as our corporate headquarters. The sublease commenced in April 2013 and was scheduled to expire in 2020. In July 2017, we terminated this sublease. In May 2017, we entered into a new 10-year lease with a related party to let 3,200 square feet in New York, NY to serve as our new corporate headquarters.

In Corvallis, we lease approximately 10,276 square feet. Until its expiration on December 31, 2017, this facility was leased under an amended lease agreement signed in January 2007, and most recently changed through an addendum in April 2015. On November 3, 2017 we entered into a new lease for the same space which expires in December 2019. This lease has two successive renewal options; one for two years and the other for three years.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may be involved in a variety of claims, suits, investigations and proceedings arising from the ordinary course of our business, collections claims, breach of contract claims, labor and employment claims, tax and other matters. Although such claims, suits, investigations and proceedings are inherently uncertain and their results cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the resolution of such current pending matters, if any, will not have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flow. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of legal costs, diversion of management resources and other factors (see Note 13 to the consolidated financial statements).

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

No disclosure is required pursuant to this item.


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PART II
 
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Price Range of Common Stock

On March 22, 2018, the Company's common stock commenced trading on The Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol "SIGA". From March 20, 2015 through March 21, 2018, the Company's common stock had been traded on the OTC Pink Sheets. The Company's common stock traded under the symbol “SIGAQ” from March 20, 2015 until April 17, 2016, and since April 18, 2016, it has traded under the Symbol “SIGA.” From September 9, 1997 through September 2, 2009, the Company's common stock was traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market and from September 3, 2009 until March 19, 2015 it was traded on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “SIGA.” Prior to September 9, 1997 there was no public market for our common stock.

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low sales prices for our common stock, as reported on The Nasdaq Global Market and OTC Pink Sheets, as applicable:
2018
High
 
Low
First Quarter
$
6.78

 
$
4.21

Second Quarter
7.54

 
5.72

Third Quarter
8.47

 
5.77

Fourth Quarter
7.94

 
4.68

 
 
 
 
2017
High
 
Low
First Quarter
$
3.40

 
$
2.80

Second Quarter
3.88

 
3.00

Third Quarter
3.39

 
2.85

Fourth Quarter
5.24

 
3.14


As of February 15, 2019, the closing sale price of our common stock was $6.99 per share. There were 35 holders of record as of February 15, 2019. We believe that the number of beneficial owners of our common stock is substantially greater than the number of record holders, because a large portion of common stock is held in broker “street names.”

We have paid no dividends on our common stock and do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain any future cash flow in excess of our operating costs to finance the growth and development of our business and to service any debt payments. Dividend payments are not permitted under the Loan Agreement.


















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Performance Graph
 
The following line graph compares the cumulative total stockholder return through December 31, 2018, assuming reinvestment of dividends, by an investor who invested $100 on December 31, 2013 in each of (i) our common stock; (ii) the Nasdaq Composite; and (iii) the Nasdaq Biotech Composite.

 
 
 
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
SIGA Technologies, Inc.
 
$
100

 
$
44

 
$
13

 
$
88

 
$
148

 
$
242

NASDAQ Composite Index
 
$
100

 
$
113

 
$
120

 
$
129

 
$
165

 
$
159

NASDAQ Biotech Composite Index
 
$
100

 
$
134

 
$
149

 
$
117

 
$
142

 
$
128


http://api.tenkwizard.com/cgi/image?quest=1&rid=23&ipage=12760625&doc=15


Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
 
The information required by this item concerning securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans is set forth in Item 12, “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.”



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Item 6. Selected Financial Data
 
The selected consolidated financial operating data for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The selected consolidated financial operating data for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 have been derived from applicable audited consolidated financial statements not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following table should be read in conjunction with Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and the consolidated financial statements and related notes to those statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
(in thousands, except share and per share data)
Revenues
$
477,054

 
$
12,269

 
$
14,988

 
$
8,176

 
$
3,140

Cost of sales and supportive services
95,269

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative
12,880

 
12,303

 
13,714

 
10,582

 
12,647

Research and development
13,016

 
16,680

 
19,711

 
13,131

 
10,707

Patent expenses
789

 
910

 
909

 
1,009

 
988

Litigation expense

 

 

 
14,407

 
188,465

Lease termination

 
1,225

 

 

 

Interest on PharmAthene liability

 

 
11,669

 

 

Income (loss) from operations
355,100

 
(18,849
)
 
(31,015
)
 
(30,953
)
 
(209,667
)
       (Increase) decrease in fair value of common stock warrants
(6,923
)
 
(4,739
)
 
(895
)
 

 
313

       Interest expense, net
(15,478
)
 
(14,758
)
 
(2,396
)
 
(267
)
 
(456
)
       Backstop fee

 

 
(1,764
)
 

 

       Other income, net
78,941

 
17

 
102

 
42

 
1

       Reorganization items, net

 

 
(3,717
)
 
(7,811
)
 
(2,127
)
Income (loss) before income taxes
411,640

 
(38,329
)
 
(39,685
)
 
(38,989
)
 
(211,936
)
Benefit from (provision for) income taxes
10,168

 
2,094

 
(14
)
 
(462
)
 
(53,528
)
Net income (loss)
$
421,808

 
$
(36,235
)
 
$
(39,699
)
 
$
(39,451
)
 
$
(265,464
)
Basic earnings (loss) per common share
$
5.28

 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.69
)
 
$
(0.73
)
 
$
(4.97
)
Diluted earnings (loss) per common share
$
5.18

 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.69
)
 
$
(0.73
)
 
$
(4.97
)
Weighted average common shares outstanding: basic
79,923,295

 
78,874,494

 
57,188,503

 
53,777,687

 
53,419,686

Weighted average common shares outstanding: diluted
82,708,472

 
78,874,494

 
57,188,503

 
53,777,687

 
53,419,686

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash
$
180,397

 
$
37,102

 
$
56,174

 
$
112,711

 
$
99,714

Total assets
203,444

 
144,670

 
160,982

 
185,733

 
160,729

Long-term obligations
76,811

 
71,891

 
66,801

 
332

 
405

Stockholders’ equity (deficiency)
102,915

 
(323,138
)
 
(287,418
)
 
(284,429
)
 
(246,502
)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
$
68,871

 
$
(18,387
)
 
$
(116,813
)
 
$
11,109

 
$
14,177


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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes to those statements and other financial information appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In addition to historical information, the following discussion and other parts of this Annual Report contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties.
 
Overview
 
We are a commercial-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the health security market. Health security comprises countermeasures for biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear attacks (biodefense market), vaccines and therapies for emerging infectious diseases, and health preparedness. Our lead product is an oral formulation of TPOXX® (“oral TPOXX®”), an antiviral drug for the treatment of human smallpox disease caused by variola virus.

On July 13, 2018 the United States Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox. Oral TPOXX® is a novel small-molecule drug that has been delivered to the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (“Strategic Stockpile”) under the Project BioShield Act of 2004 (“Project BioShield”). Concurrent with the approval, the FDA granted the Company's request for a Priority Review Voucher (“PRV”). A PRV is a voucher that may be used to obtain an accelerated FDA review of a product candidate. On October 31, 2018, the Company sold its PRV for cash consideration of $80.0 million.

Lead Product-TPOXX®
    
2018 BARDA Contract

On September 10, 2018, the Company entered into a contract with the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority ("BARDA") pursuant to which SIGA agreed to deliver up to 1,488,000 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile, and to manufacture and deliver to the Strategic Stockpile, or store as vendor-managed inventory, up to 212,000 courses of the intravenous (IV) formulation of TPOXX® (“IV TPOXX®”). Additionally, the contract includes funding from BARDA for advanced development of IV TPOXX®, post-marketing activities for oral and IV TPOXX®, and supportive procurement activities. The contract with BARDA (as amended, modified, or supplemented from time to time, the “2018 BARDA Contract”) currently contemplates, as of February 28, 2019, up to approximately $600.1 million of payments, of which approximately $51.7 million of payments are included within the base period of performance of five years, approximately $12.2 million of payments are related to exercised options and up to approximately $536.2 million of payments are currently specified as unexercised options. BARDA may choose in its sole discretion when, or whether, to exercise any of the unexercised options. The period of performance for options is up to ten years from the date of entry into the 2018 BARDA Contract and such options could be exercised at any time during the contract term, including during the base period of performance. Initially, the 2018 BARDA Contract specified payments of up to approximately $628.7 million; on February 21, 2019, a cost-reimbursement plus fixed fee option for post-marketing, and other activities for oral TPOXX® was modified to $12.2 million (from $40.8 million) based on updated planning. As such, total potential payments currently specified under the 2018 BARDA Contract are $600.1 million.

The base period of performance specifies potential payments of approximately $51.7 million for the following activities: payments of approximately $11.1 million for the delivery of approximately 35,700 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile; payments of $8.0 million for the manufacture of 20,000 courses of final drug product of IV TPOXX® ("IV FDP"), of which $3.2 million of payments are related to the manufacture of bulk drug substance ("IV BDS") to be used in the manufacture of IV FDP; payments of approximately $32.0 million to fund advanced development of IV TPOXX®; and payments of approximately $0.6 million for supportive procurement activities. As of December 31, 2018, the Company has received $3.2 million for the manufacture of IV BDS; such bulk drug substance is expected to be used for the manufacture of 20,000 courses of IV FDP.

Exercised options specify potential payments up to approximately $12.2 million for funding of post-marketing activities for oral TPOXX®.

Unexercised options specify potential payments up to approximately $536.2 million in total (if all options are exercised). There are options for the following activities: payments of up to $450.2 million for the delivery of up to approximately 1,452,300 courses of oral TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile; payments of up to $76.8 million for the manufacture of up to 192,000 courses of IV FDP, of which up to $30.7 million of payments would be paid upon the manufacture of IV BDS to be used in the manufacture

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of IV FDP; payments of up to approximately $3.6 million to fund post-marketing activities for IV TPOXX®; and payments of up to approximately $5.6 million for supportive procurement activities.

The options related to IV TPOXX® are divided into two primary manufacturing steps. There are options related to the manufacture of bulk drug substance (“IV BDS Options”), and there are corresponding options (for the same number of IV courses) for the manufacture of final drug product (“IV FDP Options”). BARDA may choose to exercise any, all, or none of these options in its sole discretion. The 2018 BARDA Contract includes: three separate IV BDS Options, each providing for the bulk drug substance equivalent of 64,000 courses of IV TPOXX®; and three separate IV FDP Options, each providing for 64,000 courses of final drug product of IV TPOXX®. BARDA has the sole discretion as to whether to simultaneously exercise IV BDS Options and IV FDP Options, or whether to make independent exercise decisions. If BARDA decides to only exercise IV BDS Options, then the Company would receive payments up to $30.7 million; alternatively, if BARDA decides to exercise both IV BDS Options and IV FDP Options, then the Company would receive payments up to $76.8 million. For each set of options relating to a specific group of courses (for instance, the IV BDS and IV FDP options that reference the same 64,000 courses), BARDA has the option to independently purchase IV BDS or IV FDP.
    
2011 BARDA Contract

On May 13, 2011, the Company signed a contract with BARDA pursuant to which BARDA agreed to buy from the Company 1.7 million courses of oral TPOXX®. Additionally, the Company agreed to contribute to BARDA 300,000 courses at no additional cost to BARDA.

The contract with BARDA (as amended, modified, or supplemented from time to time the "2011 BARDA Contract”) includes a base contract, as modified, (“2011 Base Contract”) as well as options. The 2011 Base Contract specifies approximately $508.7 million of payments (including exercised options), of which, as of December 31, 2018, $459.8 million has been received by the Company for the manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of oral TPOXX® and $43.9 million has been received for certain reimbursements in connection with development and supportive activities. Approximately $5.0 million remains eligible to be received in the future for reimbursements of development and supportive activities.

For courses of oral TPOXX® that have been physically delivered to the Strategic Stockpile under the 2011 BARDA Contract, there are product replacement obligations, including: (i) a product replacement obligation in the event that the final version of oral TPOXX® approved by the FDA was different from any courses of oral TPOXX® that had been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile (the “FDA Approval Replacement Obligation”); (ii) a product replacement obligation, at no cost to BARDA, in the event that oral TPOXX® is recalled or deemed to be recalled for any reason; and (iii) a product replacement obligation in the event that oral TPOXX® does not meet any specified label claims. On July 13, 2018, the FDA approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox and there is no difference between the approved product and courses in the Strategic Stockpile. As such, the possibility of the FDA Approval Replacement Obligation resulting in any future replacements of product within the Strategic Stockpile is remote.

The 2011 BARDA Contract includes options. On July 30, 2018, the 2011 BARDA Contract was modified and BARDA exercised its option relating to FDA approval of 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX® for which the Company was paid $50.0 million in August 2018. With the option exercise, the 2011 BARDA Contract was modified so that the 2011 Base Contract increased by $50.0 million. Remaining options, if all would be exercised by BARDA, would result in aggregate payments to the Company of $72.7 million, including up to $58.3 million of funding for development and supportive activities such as work on a post-exposure prophylaxis ("PEP") indication for TPOXX® and/or $14.4 million of funding for production-related activities related to warm-base manufacturing. BARDA may choose in its sole discretion not to exercise any or all of the unexercised options. In 2015, BARDA exercised two options related to extending the indication of the drug to the geriatric and pediatric populations. The stated value of those exercises was minimal.

The 2011 BARDA Contract expires in September 2020.

Liquidity

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern and contemplate the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. On July 13, 2018, the FDA approved the Company’s oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox. There was no difference between the approved product and courses of oral TPOXX® that had been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile. As such, in July 2018, the Company received $41 million that previously had been held back under the 2011 BARDA Contract. Additionally, since July 2018, the Company has received: a $50 million payment from BARDA in August 2018 as a result of the exercise of an option (through modification of the 2011 BARDA Contract) relating to FDA approval of 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX®; and $80

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million of cash proceeds from the sale of its PRV (defined in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements). Furthermore, the 2018 BARDA Contract, awarded in September 2018, could provide payments of up to $600 million to the Company over the next series of years. Accordingly, management believes, based on currently forecasted operating costs that the Company will continue as a going concern.

Critical Accounting Estimates
 
The methods, estimates and judgments we use in applying our accounting policies have a significant impact on the results we report in our consolidated financial statements, which we discuss under the heading “Results of Operations” following this section of our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Some of our accounting policies require us to make difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain. Our most critical accounting estimates include revenue recognition, the valuation of warrants granted or issued by us, and income taxes (including realization of deferred tax assets).

Revenue Recognition
All of our revenue is derived from long-term contracts that can span multiple years. We account for revenue in accordance with ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). The unit of account in ASC 606 is a performance obligation. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. Our performance obligations are satisfied over time as work progresses or at a point in time.

Substantially all of our revenue associated with research and development performance obligations is recognized over time. Because control transfers over time with these performance obligations, revenue is recognized based on the extent of progress towards completion of the performance obligation. The selection of the method to measure progress towards completion requires judgment and is based on the nature of the products or services to be provided. We generally use the cost-to-cost measure of progress for performance obligations connected with research and development activities because it best depicts the transfer of control to the customer, which occurs as we incur costs under our contracts. Under the cost-to-cost measure of progress, the extent of progress towards completion is measured based on the ratio of costs incurred to date to the total estimated costs to fully satisfy the performance obligation. Contract costs include labor, material, overhead and third-party services. Any loss on a research and development performance obligation would be recognized at the point in time that it became probable that a loss was going to be incurred.

Revenue under the 2011 BARDA Contract (see Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements) connected with courses of oral TPOXX® that are manufactured and delivered to the Strategic Stockpile and related services, milestones and advance payments (activities in combination that constitute one performance obligation) has been recognized at a point in time. Revenue associated with this performance obligation was recognized when BARDA obtained control of the asset, which was upon delivery to and acceptance by the customer and at the point in time when the constraint on the consideration was reasonably resolved. The consideration, which is variable, was constrained until the FDA approved oral TPOXX® for the treatment of smallpox on July 13, 2018. Prior to FDA approval, consideration had been constrained because the possibility of the FDA Approval Replacement Obligation (as defined herein) had not been quantified or specified. Following FDA approval, the possibility of having to replace product pursuant to the FDA Approval Replacement Obligation was essentially eliminated and deemed to be remote since there is no difference between the approved product and the courses of oral TPOXX® that had been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile. As a result, the deferred revenue associated with the performance obligation was recorded as product sales and supportive services for the year ended December 31, 2018.

Due to the nature of the work required to be performed on many of our performance obligations, the estimation of total revenue and costs to satisfy the obligations is complex, subject to many variables and requires significant judgment. The consideration associated with these types of performance obligations is considered variable. We estimate variable consideration as the most likely amount to which we expect to be entitled. We include estimated amounts in the transaction price to the extent it is probable that a significant reversal of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur and when any uncertainty associated with variable consideration is resolved. Our estimates of variable consideration and determination of whether to include estimated amounts in the transaction price are based largely on an assessment of our historical and anticipated performance, external factors, trends and all other information (historical, current and forecasted) that is reasonably available to us.

Contracts are often modified to account for additional services to be performed. We consider contract modifications to exist when the modification either creates new enforceable rights and obligations, or changes existing enforceable rights and obligations. If the effect of a contract modification on the transaction price changes our measure of progress for the performance

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obligation to which it relates, the impact will be recognized as an adjustment to revenue (either as an increase in or a reduction of revenue) on a cumulative catch-up basis.

We have a process in which management reviews the progress and execution of our performance obligations. As part of this process, management reviews information including, but not limited to, any outstanding key contract matters, progress towards completion and the related program schedule, identified risks and opportunities and the related changes in estimates of revenues and costs. The risks and opportunities include management’s judgment about the ability and cost to achieve the schedule, technical requirements and other contract requirements. Management must make assumptions and estimates regarding labor productivity, the complexity of the work to be performed, customer behavior and execution by our subcontractors, among other variables.

Based on this analysis, any quarterly adjustments to revenues, research and development expenses and cost of sales and supportive services are recognized as necessary in the period they become known. Changes in estimates of revenues, research and development expenses and cost of sales and supportive services are recognized quarterly on a cumulative catch-up basis, which recognizes in the current period the cumulative effect of the changes on current and prior periods based on a performance obligation’s percentage of completion. A significant change in one or more of these estimates could affect the profitability of one or more of our performance obligations.

Income Taxes
Our income tax expense and, deferred tax assets and liabilities reflect management’s best estimate of current and future taxes to be paid. We are subject to US federal income tax and state income tax in numerous jurisdictions. Significant judgments and estimates are required in the determination of our income tax expense.

Deferred income taxes arise from temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and their reported amounts in the financial statements, which will result in taxable or deductible amounts in the future. Each reporting period, we assess the realizability of our deferred tax assets to determine if the deductible temporary differences will be utilized on a more-likely-than-not basis. In making this determination, we assess all available positive and negative evidence to determine if our existing deferred tax assets are realizable on a more-likely-than-not basis. Significant weight is given to positive and negative evidence that is objectively verifiable. We consider the reversal of existing taxable temporary differences, projected future taxable income, tax planning strategies and recent financial operating results. The realization of a deferred tax asset is ultimately dependent on our generation of sufficient taxable income within the available net operating loss carryback and/or carryforward periods to utilize the deductible temporary differences. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we received FDA approval and recorded revenue related to the delivery of our oral TPOXX® product. We also recorded revenue related to the FDA holdback payment and the payment for 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX®. In addition, we entered into a new contract with BARDA for the sale of up to 1.7 million courses of TPOXX®. Based on these factors, we determined that sufficient positive evidence exists to conclude that substantially all of our deferred tax assets are realizable on a more-likely-than-not basis.

The amount of deferred tax assets considered realizable, however, could be adjusted if estimates of future taxable income during the net operating loss carryforward period change and/or if significant objective negative evidence is no longer present. Such changes could lead to a change in judgment related to the realization of the net deferred tax asset. Future changes in the estimated amount of deferred taxes expected to be realized will be reflected in our financial statements in the period the estimate is changed with a corresponding adjustment to operating results.

Income tax benefits are recognized for a tax position when, in management’s judgment, it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination by a taxing authority. For a tax position that meets the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold, the tax benefit is measured as the largest amount that is judged to have a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with a taxing authority. As of December 31, 2018, we recorded an uncertain tax position attribute reduction related to state net operating loss carryforwards. In the event that we conclude that we are subject to interest and/or penalties arising from uncertain tax positions, we will present interest and penalties as a component of income taxes.

Warrant Liability
We account for warrants in accordance with the authoritative guidance which requires that free-standing derivative financial instruments with certain cash settlement features be classified as assets or liabilities at the time of the transaction, and recorded at their fair value. Fair value is estimated using a model-derived valuation. Determining the fair value for warrants includes the expected volatility of our stock. Any changes in the fair value of the warrants are reported in earnings or loss as long as they are classified as assets or liabilities.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements     
    

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For discussion regarding the impact of accounting standards that were recently issued but are not yet effective, on our consolidated financial statements, see Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, to the consolidated financial statements.    

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Results of Operations for the Years ended December 31, 2018, 2017, and 2016
 
Revenues from product sales and supportive services for the year ended December 31, 2018 were $468.9 million. In 2017 and 2016, there were no recorded revenues from product sales and supportive services. Such revenues in 2018 are primarily associated with revenue recognition of all cash consideration received in prior periods under the 2011 BARDA Contract that is related to the delivery to the Strategic Stockpile of courses of oral TPOXX® and related services, milestones and advance payments ($375.6 million in total). In prior periods, these receipts had been deferred on the balance sheet since revenue recognition had been constrained by the possibility of a product replacement obligation being applicable. Following FDA approval of oral TPOXX® in the third quarter 2018, the possibility of the FDA Approval Replacement Obligation resulting in any future replacements of product within the Strategic Stockpile is remote, thus resulting in the recognition of revenues that previously had been deferred. In addition to the above-mentioned amounts, 2018 product sales and supportive service revenues also include $91 million received in the third quarter under the 2011 BARDA Contract in connection with a $41 million holdback payment and a $50 million payment for achieving 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX® (see Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements for further detail on these payments).

Revenues from research and development contracts and grants for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, were $8.1 million and $12.3 million, respectively. The decrease of $4.1 million, or 33.7%, primarily relates to a decrease in revenues from our federal contracts supporting the development of oral TPOXX®, partially offset by the increase in revenues from our federal contracts supporting the development of IV TPOXX®. Revenues from federal contracts supporting the development of oral TPOXX® have decreased because active studies involving oral TPOXX® have decreased in number and scale in comparison to prior year activity, reflecting the filing of a new drug application ("NDA") for oral TPOXX® in December 2017.

Revenues from research and development contracts and grants for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, were $12.3 million and $15.0 million, respectively. The decrease of $2.7 million, or 18.1%, primarily relates to a decrease in revenues from our federal contracts supporting the development of oral TPOXX®. Revenues from federal contracts supporting the development of oral TPOXX® decreased because active studies involving oral TPOXX® decreased in number and scale in comparison to prior year activity.

Cost of sales and supportive services for the year ended December 31, 2018, were $95.3 million; in 2017 and 2016, there were no recorded cost of sales and supportive services. Due to FDA approval of oral TPOXX® on July 13, 2018, all costs incurred in previous periods which had been deferred in connection with the deferral of related revenues were recognized.

Selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A”) for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were $12.9 million and $12.3 million, respectively, reflecting an increase of $0.6 million, or 4.7%. The increase is primarily attributable to a $0.3 million increase in employee compensation expense and non-recurring costs related to the application for listing our stock on The Nasdaq Global Market, partially offset by a reduction in rent expense stemming from the relocation of corporate headquarters in May 2017.

SG&A for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 were $12.3 million and $13.7 million, respectively, reflecting a decrease of $1.4 million, or 10.3%. The decrease is primarily attributable to a $1.9 million decrease in professional service fees, partially offset by a $0.9 million increase in employee compensation expense. The decrease in professional service fees is primarily due to the final resolution of the PharmAthene litigation and related strategic initiatives, which resulted in a decrease in legal fees. The net increase in employee compensation expense reflects an increase in senior management headcount, partially offset by a reduction in annual bonus expense in 2017 (one-time bonuses were paid in 2016 in connection with the satisfaction of the PharmAthene liability).

Research and development (“R&D”) expenses were $13.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, a decrease of approximately $3.7 million, or 22.0% from the $16.7 million incurred during the year ended December 31, 2017. The decrease is attributable to a $4.2 million net decrease in direct vendor-related expenses supporting the development of oral TPOXX® and IV TPOXX®. Direct vendor-related expenses related to oral TPOXX® decreased $6.6 million due to a decrease in the number and scale of active studies, while such expenses related to IV TPOXX® increased $2.4 million. The decrease in R&D expenses is also partially attributable to there being no inventory write-down expenses in 2018 as compared with a net expense of $536,000 in 2017 in connection with an inventory write-down. These net decreases were partially offset by an increase in employee compensation of approximately $1.4 million which was primarily associated with the vesting in 2018 of restricted stock awards that had been contingent upon the FDA approval of oral TPOXX®.
 


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R&D expenses were $16.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, a decrease of approximately $3.0 million, or 15.4% from the $19.7 million incurred during the year ended December 31, 2016. The decrease was primarily attributable to a decrease of $2.9 million in direct vendor-related expenses supporting the development of oral TPOXX® (number and scale of active studies decreased) and a $0.6 million decrease in bonus expense (one-time bonuses were paid in 2016 in connection with the satisfaction of the PharmAthene liability). These decreases were partially offset by a $536,000 net expense related to an inventory write-down. The $536,000 expense related to a $686,000 inventory write-down, partially offset by contractual Contract Manufacturing Organizations (“CMO”) credits received in connection with the inventory write-down.

Patent expenses for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 were $0.8 million, $0.9 million, and $0.9 million, respectively. These expenses reflect our ongoing efforts to protect our lead drug candidates in varied geographic territories.

Lease termination expense for the year ended December 31, 2017 was approximately $1.2 million. This expense relates to the Old HQ Sublease Termination Agreement. See Note 13 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information.    

For the year ended December 31, 2016, we recorded approximately $11.7 million of interest expense on the
PharmAthene liability. This amount represents interest expense related to the post-judgment interest on the Delaware Court of Chancery Final Order and Judgment. On November 16, 2016, we fully satisfied the PharmAthene liability, and thus there was no interest expense on the PharmAthene liability for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

Interest expense on the term loan facility under the Loan Agreement (the "Term Loan") for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $15.5 million, an increase of approximately $0.7 million from the $14.8 million incurred during the year ended December 31, 2017. The $15.5 million of interest for the year ended December 31, 2018 includes: $11.0 million of cash payments from restricted cash and $4.5 million of accretion of unamortized costs and fees related to the Term Loan balance. The $14.8 million of interest for the year ended December 31, 2017 includes: $10.3 million of cash payments from restricted cash and $4.5 million of accretion of unamortized costs and fees related to the Term Loan balance.

Interest expense on the Term Loan for the year ended December 31, 2017 was $14.8 million, an increase of approximately $12.4 million from the $2.4 million incurred during the year ended December 31, 2016. The increase is primarily attributable to a full 12 months of interest accrued on the Term Loan in 2017; in comparison, less than two months of interest accrued in 2016. The $14.8 million of interest for the year ended December 31, 2017 includes: $10.3 million of cash payments from restricted cash and $4.5 million of accretion of unamortized costs and fees related to the Term Loan balance. The $2.4 million of interest for the year ended December 31, 2016 included $1.3 million of cash payments from restricted cash and $1.1 million of accretion of unamortized costs and fees related to the Term Loan balance.

Changes in the fair value of liability classified warrants to acquire common stock were recorded within the income statement. For the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, we recorded a loss of approximately $6.9 million, $4.7 million and $0.9 million, respectively, reflecting an increase in fair value of liability classified warrants resulting principally from increases in the price of our common stock.     

For the year-ended December 31, 2016, we incurred a non-cash backstop fee of approximately $1.8 million in connection with a rights offering and pursuant to a backstop agreement with an affiliate of MacAndrews & Forbes Inc. and other backstop parties.

Other income, net for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $78.9 million. Other income for 2018 reflects the sale of our PRV for $80.0 million, net of related expenses as well as interest income on cash accounts. See Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements regarding the PRV transaction.

Reorganization expenses in connection with the chapter 11 filing for the year ended December 31, 2016 were approximately $3.7 million, respectively. Reorganization expenses for the year-ended December 31, 2016 represents expenses incurred up to the Effective Date of the Plan (as defined in Note 15 to the consolidated financial statements).

For the year ended December 31, 2018, we recognized a tax benefit of $10.2 million on pre-tax income of $411.6 million. Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2018 was (2.5%). During 2018, we recognized a benefit of approximately $25.8 million primarily related to the Company's assessment that our deferred tax assets are realizable on a more-likely-than-not basis and the resulting reduction of the related valuation allowance. Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2018 differs from the statutory rate primarily as a result of the reduction of the valuation allowance.


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FASB Accounting Standards Codification Topic 740, Income Taxes ("ASC 740") requires that a valuation allowance be established when it is “more likely than not” that all or a portion of deferred tax assets will not be realized. At each reporting date, we consider new evidence, both positive and negative, that could impact our view with regard to future realization of deferred tax assets. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we received FDA approval and recorded revenue related to the previous delivery of our oral TPOXX® product. We also recorded revenue related to the FDA holdback payment and the payment for 84-month expiry of oral TPOXX®. In addition, we entered into a new contract with BARDA for the purchase of up to 1.7 million courses of TPOXX®. Based on these factors, we determined that sufficient positive evidence existed to conclude that substantially all of our deferred tax assets were realizable on a more-likely-than-not basis.

For the year ended December 31, 2017, we recognized a tax benefit of approximately $2.1 million on a pre-tax loss of $38.3 million. Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2017 was 5.5%.

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax reform commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”). Under ASC 740, the effects of changes in tax rates and laws are recognized in the period which the new legislation is enacted. The TCJA makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code, including, but not limited to: (1) reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%; (2) changing rules related to uses and limitations of net operating loss carryforwards created in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017; (3) bonus depreciation that will allow for full expensing of qualified property; (4) creating a new limitation on deductible interest expense; (5) eliminating the corporate alternative minimum tax; (6) limitation on the deductibility of executive compensation under Internal Revenue Code §162(m); and (7) new tax rules related to foreign operations.

In connection with the initial analysis of the impact of the TCJA as of December 31, 2017, we recorded a provisional decrease in our deferred tax assets and liabilities with a corresponding adjustment to the related valuation allowance. In addition, the Company recorded an income tax benefit of $2.1 million primarily related to our Minimum Tax Credit carryforwards as such amounts will be refundable, in cash, under TCJA. As of December 31, 2018, the Company has approximately $2.7 million of minimum tax credits which are expected to be refunded no later than 2021.

In response to the TCJA, the SEC staff issued Staff Accounting Bulletin ("SAB") No. 118 which provides guidance on accounting for the tax effects of TCJA. The purpose of SAB No. 118 was to address any uncertainty or diversity of view in applying ASC 740 in the reporting period in which the TCJA was enacted. In addition, SAB No. 118 provides a measurement period that should not extend beyond one year from the TCJA enactment date for companies to complete the accounting under ASC 740. For the year ended December 31, 2017, we recorded a provisional decrease in our deferred tax assets and liabilities with a corresponding adjustment to the related valuation allowance. In addition, we recorded an income tax benefit of $2.7 million related to the elimination of the AMT as such amounts will be refundable, in cash, under TCJA. We expect to collect the refund no later than 2021. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we finalized the accounting for the tax effects of TCJA with no material changes to the provisional estimate recorded in 2017.

For the year ended 2016, we incurred a tax provision of $13,884 on pre-tax net losses of $39.7 million. Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2016 was (0.03%). Our effective tax rate was impacted by recurring items such as current operating losses with no tax benefit, federal alternative minimum tax, state taxes, and the change in the valuation allowance for deferred tax liabilities associated with indefinite-lived intangible assets. Such deferred tax liabilities generally cannot be used as a source of taxable income to realize deferred tax assets with a definitive loss carryforward period.

Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
As of December 31, 2018, we had $100.7 million in cash and cash equivalents compared with $19.9 million at December 31, 2017. Additionally, as of December 31, 2018, we had $79.7 million of restricted cash compared with $17.2 million at December 31, 2017. The restricted cash is available to pay interest, fees and principal on the Term Loan. The increase in the restricted cash relates to the sale of our PRV. See Note 7 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information.

Operating Activities
We prepare our consolidated statement of cash flows using the indirect method. Under this method, we reconcile net income (loss) to cash flows from operating activities by adjusting net income (loss) for those items that impact net income (loss) but may not result in actual cash receipts or payments during the period. These reconciling items include but are not limited to stock-based compensation and changes in the fair value of our warrant liability; gains and losses from various transactions and changes in the consolidated balance sheet for working capital from the beginning to the end of the period.

Net cash provided by (used in) operations for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 was $68.9 million and $(18.4) million, respectively.  For the year ended December 31, 2018, the primary sources of cash inflows were a $41.0 million holdback

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payment under the 2011 BARDA Contract (see Note 3) and a $50.0 million payment from BARDA in connection with a modification made to the 2011 BARDA Contract, in which BARDA exercised an option relating to FDA approval of 84-month expiry for oral TPOXX®. These receipts were partially offset by net operating costs and $11.0 million of cash interest expense on the Term Loan. For the year ended December 31, 2017, cash usage was primarily due to: $26.7 million of cash operating expenses (net loss adjusted for non-cash items noted in the cash flow statement such as interest expense and change in fair value of warrants) and $4.9 million of payments to CMOs for the manufacture and related support of TPOXX®, partially offset by $8.5 million of cash received from BARDA for product deliveries of oral TPOXX® as well as reimbursement payments under the BARDA contract of certain vendor costs that were paid in the prior year.
 
Net cash (used in) operations for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 was $(18.4) million and $(116.8) million, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2017, cash usage was primarily due to: $26.7 million of cash operating expenses (net loss adjusted for non-cash items noted in the cash flow statement such as interest expense and change in fair value of warrants) and $4.9 million of payments to CMOs for the manufacture and related support of TPOXX®, partially offset by $8.5 million of cash received from BARDA for product deliveries of oral TPOXX® as well as reimbursement payments under the BARDA contract of certain vendor costs that were paid in the prior year. For the year ended December 31, 2016, cash usage was primarily attributable to $170 million of payments made to PharmAthene by the Company, which in combination with a $46.9 million payment made directly to PharmAthene by the Lender under the Term Loan, fully satisfied the PharmAthene claim (the $46.9 million payment by the Lender is not part of operating activities within the cash flow statement). Cash usage was also due to: operating expenses; costs attendant to the administration of the chapter 11 case; pre-petition claim payments (other than the PharmAthene claim); $31.4 million of payments to CMOs for the manufacture and related support of TPOXX®. These amounts were partially offset by $111.2 million of cash received from BARDA for product deliveries of oral TPOXX® and achieving a milestone under the BARDA contract.
    
On December 31, 2018 and 2017, our accounts receivable balance was approximately $2.0 million (which includes approximately $0.6 million of unbilled receivables) and $1.8 million, respectively. Our accounts receivable balances primarily reflect reimbursable work performed during December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, in connection with TPOXX®.
    
Investing Activities
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 was $78.2 million and $(0.1) million, respectively. In 2018, we received net proceeds of approximately $78.3 million related to the sale of our PRV. In 2017, net cash used related to capital expenditures.

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 was $(0.1) million and $1.2 million, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2017 we purchased approximately $0.1 million of equipment in the ordinary course of business. For the year ended December 31, 2016, we received approximately $1.2 million in connection with the return of collateral supporting a surety bond that had been posted in 2012 in connection with the PharmAthene litigation.

Financing Activities
Net cash used in financing activities for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 was $3.8 million and $0.6 million, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2018, cash was used to repurchase $4.1 million of common stock to meet minimum statutory tax withholding requirements for shares issued to employees in connection with the release of restricted stock units and the exercise of stock appreciation rights and options. Additionally, we received approximately $0.3 million in exercise price payments in connection with the exercise of options. For the year ended December 31, 2017, cash was used to repurchase $0.6 million of common stock to meet minimum statutory tax withholding requirements for shares issued to employees in connection with the release of restricted stock units and the exercise of stock appreciation rights and options. Additionally, we bought back $84,000 of options at their intrinsic value, and we received $89,000 in exercise price payments in connection with the exercise of options.

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 was $(0.6) million and $59.1 million, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2017, cash was used to repurchase $0.6 million of common stock to meet minimum statutory tax withholding requirements for shares issued to employees in connection with the release of restricted stock units and the exercise of stock appreciation rights and options. Additionally, we bought back $84,000 of options at intrinsic value, and we received $89,000 in connection with the exercise of options. On November 16, 2016, the Term Loan was funded and a rights offering was completed. The rights offering provided net proceeds of approximately $34.6 million through the sale of 23.5 million shares of common stock. In connection with the Term Loan, we paid $3.8 million of costs. Separately, during 2016, we repurchased $0.4 million of common stock to meet minimum statutory tax withholding requirements for restricted shares issued to employees. The Term Loan provided $46.9 million ($50 million, less fees and expenses of $3.1 million) that was paid directly by the Lender to PharmAthene as part of the full satisfaction of the PharmAthene claim. The Term Loan placed an additional $30

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million in a reserve account to be utilized primarily to pay interest on the Term Loan (such amount being recorded as restricted cash).

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Contractual Obligations, Commercial Commitments and Purchase Obligations
 
Future contractual obligations and commercial commitments as of December 31, 2018 are expected to be as follows:
 
Total
 
Less than 1 year
 
1 to 3 years
 
3 to 5 years
 
Greater than 5 years
Operating lease obligations (1)
$
3,019,928

 
$
541,376

 
$
608,000

 
$
672,774

 
$
1,197,778

Term loan obligations at maturity
84,000,000

 

 
84,000,000

 

 

Interest payment obligations on the Term Loan (2)
21,523,631

 
11,452,078

 
10,071,553

 

 

Purchase obligations (3)
7,224,223

 
6,679,261

 
488,530

 
56,432

 

Payments under Lease Termination Agreement
568,057

 
336,955

 
231,102

 

 

Total contractual obligations
$
116,335,839

 
$
19,009,670

 
$
95,399,185

 
$
729,206

 
$
1,197,778


(1)
Includes facilities and office space under two operating leases expiring in 2019 and 2027, respectively. These obligations assume non-termination of agreements and represent expected payments, which are subject to change.

(2)
Includes amounts to be paid with restricted cash. Assumes cash interest rate of 14.1% (the rate at December 31, 2018) throughout the duration of the Term Loan.

(3)
Includes purchase orders for manufacturing and R&D activities.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
Our investment portfolio includes cash and cash equivalents. Our main investment objective is the preservation of investment capital. We believe that our investment policy is conservative, both in the duration of our investments and the credit quality of the investments we hold. We do not utilize derivative financial instruments, derivative commodity instruments or other market risk sensitive instruments, positions or transactions to manage exposure to interest rate changes. As such, we believe that, the securities we hold are subject to market risk, changes in the financial standing of the issuer of such securities and our interest income is sensitive to changes in the general level of U.S. interest rates. Additionally, we are also subject to the risk of rising LIBOR rates; whenever the minimum rates for one-month, two-month, three-month and six-month LIBOR rates (“minimum LIBOR rate”) are above 1%, then the interest rate charged on the Term Loan could increase materially depending on the magnitude of any increase in LIBOR rates. For every increase of 0.5% in the minimum LIBOR rate (e.g., an increase from a LIBOR rate of 2.50% to 3.00%), annual interest payments on the Term Loan would increase by approximately $0.4 million. Furthermore, we are subject to the impact of stock price fluctuations of our common stock in that we have a liability-classified warrant in which 1.7 million shares of SIGA common stock can be purchased at a strike price of $1.50 per share. For every $1 increase in the stock price of SIGA, the intrinsic value of the liability-classified warrant will increase by approximately $1.7 million.

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Index to the Consolidated Financial Statements
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Shareholders and Board of Directors of SIGA Technologies, Inc.
Opinions on the Financial Statements and Internal Control over Financial Reporting

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of SIGA Technologies, Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss), changes in stockholders' equity/(deficiency), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018, including the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). We also have audited the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the COSO.

Change in Accounting Principles

As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for revenues from contracts with customers and the manner in which it accounts for the classification and presentation of restricted cash on the consolidated statements of cash flows in 2018.

Basis for Opinions

The Company's management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express opinions on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud, and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.

Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

Definition and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and

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dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.


/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Florham Park, New Jersey
March 5, 2019

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 1997.  








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SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
As of
 
December 31, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
100,652,809

 
$
19,857,833

Restricted cash, short-term
11,452,078

 
10,701,305

Accounts receivable
1,959,133

 
1,802,107

Inventory
2,908,210

 
2,983,249

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
4,317,615

 
2,019,999

       Total current assets
121,289,845

 
37,364,493

 
 
 
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
171,274

 
138,640

Restricted cash, long-term
68,292,023

 
6,542,448

Deferred costs

 
96,592,334

Deferred tax asset, net
11,733,385

 
2,431,963

Goodwill
898,334

 
898,334

Other assets
1,058,880

 
702,167

        Total assets
$
203,443,741

 
$
144,670,379

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY/(DEFICIENCY)
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
 Accounts payable
$
1,688,488

 
$
1,328,867

 Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
9,648,917

 
5,481,579

         Total current liabilities
11,337,405

 
6,810,446

Deferred revenue

 
377,641,485

Warrant liability
12,380,939

 
11,466,162

Other liabilities
1,263,113

 
840,253

Long-term debt
75,547,597

 
71,050,324

         Total liabilities
100,529,054

 
467,808,670

Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)
 
 
 
Stockholders' equity/(deficiency)
 
 
 
Common stock ($.0001 par value, 600,000,000 shares authorized, 80,763,350 and 79,039,000 issued and outstanding at December 31, 2018, and December 31, 2017, respectively)
8,076

 
7,904

Additional paid-in capital
218,697,872

 
214,229,581

Accumulated deficit
(115,791,261
)
 
(537,375,776
)
              Total stockholders' equity/(deficiency)
102,914,687

 
(323,138,291
)
              Total liabilities and stockholders' equity/(deficiency)
$
203,443,741

 
$
144,670,379


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
For the Years Ended December 31
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
   Product sales and supportive services
$
468,918,468

 
$

 
$

   Research and development
8,135,314

 
12,268,960

 
14,987,628

     Total revenues
477,053,782

 
12,268,960

 
14,987,628

 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
   Cost of sales and supportive services
95,268,974

 

 

   Selling, general and administrative
12,879,738

 
12,303,050

 
13,713,635

   Research and development
13,016,183

 
16,679,712

 
19,710,673

   Patent expenses
789,489

 
909,946

 
909,376

   Lease termination

 
1,225,421

 

   Interest on PharmAthene liability

 

 
11,668,900

  Total operating expenses
121,954,384

 
31,118,129

 
46,002,584

      Operating income (loss)
355,099,398

 
(18,849,169
)
 
(31,014,956
)
Loss from change in fair value of warrant liability
(6,922,624
)
 
(4,738,753
)
 
(894,785
)
Interest expense
(15,478,203
)
 
(14,758,140
)
 
(2,395,517
)
Backstop fee

 

 
(1,764,240
)
Other income, net
78,940,985

 
16,788

 
102,324

Reorganization items, net

 

 
(3,716,902
)
        Income (loss) before income taxes
411,639,556

 
(38,329,274
)
 
(39,684,076
)
Benefit/(provision) for income taxes
10,168,272

 
2,093,790

 
(13,884
)
      Net and comprehensive income (loss)
$
421,807,828

 
$
(36,235,484
)
 
$
(39,697,960
)
   Basic earnings (loss) per share
$
5.28

 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.69
)
   Diluted earnings (loss) per share
$
5.18

 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.69
)
   Weighted average shares outstanding: basic
79,923,295

 
78,874,494

 
57,188,503

   Weighted average shares outstanding: diluted
82,708,472

 
78,874,494

 
57,188,503


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

46

Table of Contents

SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY/(DEFICIENCY)
For the Years Ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accumulated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Additional
 
 
 
Other
 
Total
 
Common Stock
 
Paid-In
 
Accumulated
 
Comprehensive
 
Stockholders’
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Capital
 
Deficit
 
Income (Loss)
 
Equity/ (Deficiency)
Balances, December 31, 2015
54,114,296

 
$
5,411

 
$
177,008,371

 
$
(461,442,332
)
 
$

 
$
(284,428,550
)
Net loss
 
 
 
 
 
 
(39,697,960
)
 
 
 
(39,697,960
)
Issuance of common stock upon exercise of RSUs
483,335

 
48

 
(48
)
 
 
 
 
 

Stock-based compensation
 
 
 
 
775,541

 
 
 
 
 
775,541

Payment of common stock tendered for employee stock-based compensation tax obligations
(136,744
)
 
(13
)
 
(427,996
)
 
 
 
 
 
(428,009
)
Issuance of common stock associated with rights offering
23,523,195

 
2,352

 
34,594,117

 
 
 
 
 
34,596,469

Issuance of common stock associated with backstop agreement
708,530

 
71

 
1,764,169

 
 
 
 
 
1,764,240

Balances, December 31, 2016
78,692,612

 
$
7,869

 
$
213,714,154

 
$
(501,140,292
)
 
$

 
$
(287,418,269
)
Net loss
 
 
 
 
 
 
(36,235,484
)
 
 
 
(36,235,484
)
Issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options
33,870

 
3

 
89,495

 
 
 
 
 
89,498

Issuance of common stock upon vesting of RSUs and exercise of stock-settled appreciation rights
466,328

 
47

 
(47
)
 
 
 
 
 

Payment of common stock tendered for employee stock-based compensation tax obligations
(153,810
)
 
(15
)
 
(591,052
)
 
 
 
 
 
(591,067
)
Stock-based compensation

 

 
1,101,031

 
 
 
 
 
1,101,031

Buy-back of stock options

 

 
(84,000
)
 
 
 
 
 
(84,000
)
Balances, December 31, 2017
79,039,000

 
$
7,904

 
$
214,229,581

 
$
(537,375,776
)
 
$

 
$
(323,138,291
)
Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
421,807,828

 
 
 
421,807,828

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options
426,366

 
42

 
261,837

 

 

 
261,879

Issuance of common stock upon vesting of RSUs and exercise of stock-settled appreciation rights
1,184,283

 
118

 
(118
)
 

 

 

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of warrants
760,626

 
77

 
6,007,770

 

 

 
6,007,847

Payment of common stock tendered for employee stock-based compensation tax obligations
(646,925
)
 
(65
)
 
(4,074,375
)
 

 

 
(4,074,440
)
Cumulative effect of accounting change

 

 

 
(223,313
)
 

 
(223,313
)
 Stock-based compensation

 

 
2,273,177

 

 

 
2,273,177

Balances, December 31, 2018
80,763,350

 
$
8,076

 
$
218,697,872

 
$
(115,791,261
)
 
$

 
$
102,914,687


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
For the Years Ended December 31
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
421,807,828

 
$
(36,235,484
)
 
$
(39,697,960
)
 Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
   Depreciation and other amortization
69,630

 
132,189

 
174,275

   Loss on change in fair value of warrant liability
6,922,624

 
4,738,753

 
894,785

   Lease termination

 
1,225,421

 

   Stock-based compensation
2,273,177

 
1,101,031

 
775,541

   Net realization of deferred revenue and costs due to FDA approval
(281,950,853
)
 

 

   Deferred income taxes (benefit)/provision
(9,301,422
)
 
(2,718,029
)
 
20,423

   Write down of inventory, net

 
536,000

 

   Non-cash backstop fee

 

 
1,764,240

   Non-cash interest expense
4,497,273

 
4,497,271

 
566,779

               Gain on sale of priority review voucher
(78,338,826
)
 

 

        Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
                     Accounts receivable
(49,723
)
 
1,352,263

 
522,360

                     Inventory
39

 
22,690,715

 
(13,762,876
)
                     Deferred costs

 
(23,943,057
)
 
(19,712,849
)
                     Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(2,222,616
)
 
(1,065,573
)
 
(330,443
)
                     Other assets
(356,713
)
 
(60,084
)
 
80,928

                     Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities
1,622,331

 
(1,847,427
)
 
(177,342
)
                     Liabilities subject to compromise

 

 
(160,072,170
)
                     Deferred revenue
3,475,714

 
11,412,898

 
112,225,534

              Other liabilities
422,860

 
(203,654
)
 
(84,228
)
           Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
68,871,323

 
(18,386,767
)
 
(116,813,003
)
Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
       Capital expenditures
(102,264
)
 
(100,124
)
 
(23,927
)
                    Net proceeds from sale of priority review voucher
78,338,826

 

 

                    Return of collateral for surety bond

 

 
1,212,591

               Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
78,236,562

 
(100,124
)
 
1,188,664

Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
                    Net proceeds from exercise of stock options
261,879

 
89,498

 

              Net proceeds from equity rights offering - net of offering costs

 

 
34,596,468

              Proceeds from Term Loan escrow release

 

 
28,694,444

                    Buy back of stock options

 
(84,000
)
 

                    Payment of employee tax obligations for common stock tendered
(4,074,440
)
 
(591,067
)
 
(428,009
)
                    Debt issue costs

 

 
(3,775,546
)
              Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
(3,812,561
)
 
(585,569
)
 
59,087,357

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
143,295,324

 
(19,072,460
)
 
(56,536,982
)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at the beginning of period
37,101,586

 
56,174,046

 
112,711,028

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period
$
180,396,910

 
$
37,101,586

 
$
56,174,046

 
 
 
 
 
 
Supplemental disclosure of cash inflows information:
 
 
 
 
 
Conversion of warrant