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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
x
Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2017
 
Or
¨
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
For the transition period from ________ to ___________

Commission File No. 0-23047
SIGA Technologies, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
13-3864870
(State or other jurisdiction of
(IRS Employer Identification. No.)
incorporation or organization)
 
 
 
660 Madison Avenue, Suite 1700
10065
New York, NY
(zip code)
(Address of principal executive offices)
 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 672-9100
 
 
 
 
 


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No ¨.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definition of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer", "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer ¨
 
Accelerated filer x
Non-accelerated filer ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company ¨
 
 
Emerging growth company ¨
                            
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes ¨ No x.
 
As of April 28, 2017 the registrant had outstanding 78,780,059 shares of common stock, par value $.0001, per share
 

 



Table of Contents

SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
FORM 10-Q

Table of Contents
 
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 





Table of Contents

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1 - Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
 
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)
 
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
30,103,574

 
$
28,701,824

Restricted cash and cash equivalents-short term
10,138,890

 
10,138,890

Accounts receivable
4,878,631

 
3,154,370

Inventory
19,119,555

 
26,209,964

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
932,003

 
954,426

Total current assets
$
65,172,653

 
$
69,159,474

 
 
 
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
263,302

 
299,477

Restricted cash and cash equivalents-long term

14,805,554

 
17,333,332

Deferred costs
79,038,559

 
72,649,277

Goodwill
898,334

 
898,334

Other assets
642,083

 
642,083

Total assets
$
160,820,485

 
$
160,981,977

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
2,259,096

 
$
2,517,072

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
2,948,349

 
4,584,752

Warrant liability
7,353,618

 
6,727,409

Total current liabilities
12,561,063

 
13,829,233

Deferred revenue
376,203,046

 
367,483,905

Deferred income tax liability, net
307,256

 
286,066

Other liabilities
225,824

 
247,989

Loan payable
67,661,969

 
66,553,053

Total liabilities
456,959,158

 
448,400,246

     Commitments and Contingencies

 

Stockholders’ deficit
 
 
 
Common stock ($.0001 par value, 600,000,000 shares authorized, 78,780,059 and 78,692,612 issued and outstanding at March 31, 2017, and December 31, 2016, respectively)
7,878

 
7,869

Additional paid-in capital
213,608,687

 
213,714,154

Accumulated deficit
(509,755,238
)
 
(501,140,292
)
Total stockholders’ deficit
(296,138,673
)
 
(287,418,269
)
Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit
$
160,820,485

 
160,981,977


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

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SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS (UNAUDITED)
 
 
Three months ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues
 
 
 
Research and development
$
5,201,786

 
$
1,269,733

 
 
 
 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative
2,869,869

 
2,656,231

Research and development
6,360,490

 
2,536,011

Patent preparation fees
240,597

 
219,715

Interest on PharmAthene liability

 
2,917,187

Total operating expenses
9,470,956

 
8,329,144

Operating loss
(4,269,170
)
 
(7,059,411
)
Decrease (increase) in fair value warrant liability
(626,209
)
 

Interest expense
(3,608,916
)
 

Other income, net
4,419

 
11,311

Reorganization items, net

 
(3,389,173
)
   Loss before income taxes
(8,499,876
)
 
(10,437,273
)
Provision for income taxes
(115,070
)
 
(11,294
)
Net and comprehensive loss
$
(8,614,946
)
 
$
(10,448,567
)
Loss per share: basic and diluted
$
(0.11
)
 
$
(0.19
)
Weighted average shares outstanding: basic and diluted
78,777,144

 
54,114,296


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

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SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
 
Three months ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(8,614,946
)
 
$
(10,448,567
)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and other amortization
36,175

 
44,452

Increase in fair value of warrant liability
626,209

 

Stock-based compensation
87,594

 
195,865

Non-cash interest expense
1,108,916

 

Interest expense on term loan - paid with restricted cash
2,527,778

 

Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
                     Accounts receivable
(1,724,261
)
 
2,673,576

                     Inventory
7,090,409

 
(10,394,773
)
                     Deferred costs
(6,389,282
)
 
(99,207
)
                     Prepaid expenses and other current assets
22,423

 
71,367

                     Deferred income taxes, net
21,190

 
12,252

                     Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities
(1,894,379
)
 
6,205,732

                     Liabilities subject to compromise

 
2,903,332

                     Deferred revenue
8,719,141

 
215,825

                     Other liabilities
(22,165
)
 
(21,057
)
               Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
1,594,802

 
(8,641,203
)
Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
Capital expenditures

 
(8,475
)
              Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 
(8,475
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
Payment of employee tax obligations for common stock tendered
(193,052
)
 

              Net cash used by financing activities
(193,052
)
 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
1,401,750

 
(8,649,678
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
28,701,824

 
112,711,028

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
30,103,574

 
104,061,350

 
 
 
 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flows information:
 
 
 
Cash interest paid on Term Loan from restricted cash
$
2,527,778

 
$

 
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

5


SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS



1. Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
 
The financial statements are presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) for quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2016, included in the 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K. All terms used but not defined elsewhere herein have the meaning ascribed to them in the Company’s 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on March 7, 2017. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal and recurring adjustments) considered necessary for a fair statement of the results of the interim periods presented have been included. The 2016 year-end condensed balance sheet data was derived from the audited financial statements but does not include all disclosures required by U.S. GAAP. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for the full year.


Closing of Chapter 11 Case

On April 12, 2016, the Company emerged from chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code when the Company's plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) became effective, and on December 22, 2016 the Company's chapter 11 case was closed by the Bankruptcy Court. Under the Plan, the Company fully paid all of its claims. The Company did not apply the provision of fresh start accounting as ownership of existing shares of the Company's common stock remained unaltered by the Plan.

Prior to the effective date of the Plan (April 12, 2016), the Company was operating its business as a “debtor-in-possession”. The Company had filed on September 16, 2014 a voluntary petition for relief under chapter 11 of Title 11 of the United States Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York (the “Bankruptcy Court”) chapter 11 Case Number 14-12623 (SHL). The chapter 11 case preserved the Company's ability to satisfy its commitments under the BARDA Contract (as defined in Note 3 to the financial statements) and preserved its operations, which likely would have been jeopardized by the enforcement of a judgment stemming from the Company's litigation with PharmAthene, Inc. (“PharmAthene”) (see “PharmAthene Litigation” below). While operating as a debtor-in-possession under chapter 11, the Company pursued an appeal of the Delaware Court of Chancery Final Order and Judgment, without having to post a bond.

PharmAthene Litigation

On November 16, 2016, the Company satisfied the Outstanding Judgment (defined in Note 14 to the financial statements) owed to PharmAthene in connection with the Company's litigation with PharmAthene. In total, PharmAthene was paid $217 million in connection with the Outstanding Judgment. See Note 14 to the financial statements for details related to the litigation.

Liquidity

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern and contemplate the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company is not entitled to receive any additional procurement-related payments under the current BARDA Contract (Note 3) until U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") approval of TPOXX® has been achieved and until a cumulative 2 million courses of TPOXX® have been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile. Upon meeting these requirements, the Company is entitled to a $41 million hold back payment under the BARDA Contract. Based on a targeted New Drug Application ("NDA") filing for TPOXX® by the end of 2017, it is currently anticipated that the Company will be eligible to receive the $41 million hold back payment in the second half of 2018.

In the event that the Company does not receive a substantial portion of the hold back payment by the third quarter of 2018, then, based on currently forecasted operating costs, the Company will require additional sources of funding to continue operations and prevent an event of default under the Term Loan (Note 7). In this case, the Company would seek to increase cash liquidity by: raising proceeds through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, or the modification of the existing BARDA Contract; significantly reducing its operating expenses; or modifying the terms of the Loan Agreement. There can be no assurance that the Company will cumulatively deliver 2 million courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile, or that TPOXX® will receive FDA approval on a timely basis, if at all. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the Company would

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be able to increase cash liquidity, if needed, through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, the modification of the existing BARDA Contract, or a significant reduction of its operating expenses or operations, or that the lenders would agree to modify the Term Loan Agreement, if needed.


2. Reorganization Items, net:

Reorganization items represent expenses in connection with the chapter 11 case. For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, reorganization items consisted of the following:

 
March 31, 2017
March 31, 2016
Legal fees
$

$
1,677,945

Professional fees

1,698,228

Trustee fees

13,000

Total
$

$
3,389,173


During the three months ended March 31, 2016, the Company paid approximately
$1.5 million for reorganization items.

3. Procurement Contract and Research Agreements
 
Procurement Contract
On May 13, 2011, the Company signed a contract with the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (“BARDA”) pursuant to which SIGA agreed to deliver two million courses of TPOXX® to the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (“Strategic Stockpile”). The contract with BARDA (as modified, the “BARDA Contract”) is worth approximately $472 million, including $409.8 million related to the manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of TPOXX® and $62 million of potential reimbursements connected to development and supportive activities (the “Base Contract”).

Under the Base Contract, BARDA has agreed to buy from the Company 1.7 million courses of TPOXX®. Additionally, the Company expects to contribute to BARDA 300,000 courses at no additional cost to BARDA. A total of 2.0 million courses of TPOXX® is required to be delivered to the Strategic Stockpile in order for the Company to receive the $41 million hold back payment (see description of hold back payment below).

For courses of TPOXX® that are physically delivered to the Strategic Stockpile, the Company has replacement obligations, at no cost to BARDA, in the event that the final version of TPOXX® approved by the FDA is different from any courses of TPOXX® that has been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile or if TPOXX® does not meet any specified label claims, fails release testing or does not meet 38 month expiry period (from time of delivery to the Strategic Stockpile), or if TPOXX® is recalled or deemed to be recalled for any reason.

On June 28, 2016, the Company entered into a modification of the BARDA Contract (the “BARDA Contract Modification”). The total value of the BARDA Contract is unchanged. Pursuant to the BARDA Contract Modification:

The payment for the manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of TPOXX® increased by $61.5 million. This was accomplished by reducing the holdback amount that is tied to the FDA approval of TPOXX® from $102.5 million to $41 million. In July 2016, the Company received payment of $32.6 million in connection with the BARDA Contract Modification for courses previously delivered to the Strategic Stockpile.
The requirements for the $20.5 million milestone changed. For payment, this milestone was modified to require the Company to submit documentation to BARDA indicating that data covering the first 100 subjects enrolled in the phase III pivotal safety study have been submitted to and reviewed by a Data & Safety Monitoring Board (“DSMB”) and that such DSMB has recommended continuation of the safety study, as well as submission of the final pivotal rabbit efficacy study report to the FDA. Previously, this milestone required the successful submission to the FDA of a complete application for TPOXX® regulatory approval. During the third quarter of 2016, the Company met the modified milestone and received payment.

As of March 31, 2017, the Company has received $368.9 million under the Base Contract related to the manufacture and physical delivery of courses of TPOXX®. Included in this amount are a $41 million advance payment in 2011 for the completion of certain planning and preparatory activities related to the Base Contract, a $12.3 million milestone payment in 2012 for the completion of the product labeling strategy for TPOXX®, an $8.2 million milestone payment in 2013 for the completion of the commercial

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validation campaign for TPOXX®, the $20.5 million milestone payment (referenced above) in 2016 for submission of documentation to BARDA indicating that data covering the first 100 subjects enrolled in the phase III pivotal safety study have been submitted to and reviewed by a DSMB and that such DSMB has recommended continuation of the safety study, as well as submission of the final pivotal rabbit efficacy study report to the FDA, and $286.9 million of payments for physical deliveries of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile beginning in 2013.

As of March 31, 2017, the Company is eligible under the Base Contract to receive a $41 million hold back payment, which represents an approximate 10% hold back on the $409.8 million of total payments related to the manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of TPOXX® that are to be purchased by BARDA. The $41 million hold back payment would be triggered by FDA approval of TPOXX®, as long as the Company has cumulatively delivered 2.0 million courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile and the Company does not have a continuing product replacement obligation to BARDA.

With regard to future product deliveries after March 31, 2017, the Company expects to deliver approximately 467,000 courses of TPOXX® at no cost to BARDA in order to fulfill the delivery requirements of the BARDA Contract. Courses to be delivered are expected to be at a dosage of 600 mg administered twice per day (1,200 mg per day). The “no cost to BARDA” courses are primarily attributable to a change in TPOXX® dosage (see paragraph below). Courses delivered to the Strategic Stockpile are subject to a product replacement obligation.

Starting in 2015, product deliveries of TPOXX® have been at a provisional dosage of 600 mg administered twice per day (1,200 mg per day). This is a change from the provisional dosage that was in effect when product deliveries were made in 2013 and 2014 (600 mg per day). In 2013 and 2014, the provisional dosage of courses delivered to the Strategic Stockpile was 600 mg administered once a day. The change in the provisional dosage was based on FDA guidance received by the Company in 2014, subsequent to the delivery of 1.3 million courses of TPOXX®. Based on the current provisional dosage of 600 mg administered twice per day (1,200 mg per day), the Company expects to supplement previously delivered courses of TPOXX®, at no cost to BARDA, with additional dosages so that all of the courses previously delivered to BARDA will be at the current provisional dosage. The Company and BARDA agreed to an amendment (the “BARDA Amendment”) of the BARDA Contract to reflect the foregoing. In February 2016, the FDA confirmed (through dose concurrence) its earlier dosage guidance of 600 mg administered twice per day (1,200 mg per day).

The Company is incurring significant incremental costs with the production of additional dosage at no cost to BARDA.

In addition to the Base Contract, the BARDA Contract also separately contains $122.7 million of options that, if exercised by BARDA: would result in a $50 million payment to the Company in the event of FDA approval for extension to 84-month expiry for TPOXX® (from 38 month expiry as required in the Base Contract); would fund up to $58.3 million of development and supportive activities such as work on a smallpox prophylaxis indication for TPOXX®; and/or would fund $14.4 million of production-related activities related to warm-base manufacturing. In 2015, BARDA exercised two options related to extending the indication of the drug to the geriatric and pediatric populations. The stated value of these exercises was minimal. BARDA may not exercise additional options in the future. Options are exercisable by BARDA at its sole discretion. BARDA has indicated that it will evaluate, after the FDA’s review and evaluation of stability data, the Company's request that BARDA exercise the option for the $50 million payment to the Company in the event of FDA approval of 84-month expiry for TPOXX®.

The BARDA Contract expires in September 2020.

The BARDA Contract is a multiple deliverable arrangement comprising delivery of courses and covered research and development activities. The BARDA Contract provides certain product replacement rights with respect to delivered courses. For this reason, recognition of revenue that might otherwise occur upon delivery of courses is expected to be deferred until the Company’s obligations related to potential replacement of delivered courses are satisfied. The Company assessed the selling price for each of the aforementioned deliverables - research and development activities and drug product. The selling price of certain reimbursed research and development services was determined by reference to existing and past research and development grants and contracts between the Company and various government agencies. The selling price of drug product was determined by reference to other Companies’ sales of drug products such as antiviral therapeutics, orphan drugs and drugs with potential life-saving impact similar to TPOXX®, including products delivered to the Strategic Stockpile.

The Company has recognized revenue for reimbursement of certain BARDA Contract research and development services. Cash inflows related to delivery of courses will continue to be recorded as deferred revenue. In addition, direct costs incurred by the Company to fulfill the delivery of courses including the supplementing of courses previously delivered under the BARDA Contract are being deferred and will be recognized as expenses over the same period that the related deferred revenue is recognized as revenue.


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As of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, deferred direct costs under the BARDA Contract of approximately $78.4 million and $72.2 million, respectively, are included in deferred costs on the consolidated balance sheets. As of March 31, 2017, the Company recorded $376.2 million of deferred revenue. Deferred revenue has been recorded for the delivery of courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile and certain supportive services provided as part of the BARDA Contract. For the three months ended March 31, 2017, revenue from reimbursed research and development was $4.7 million.

Research Agreements
The Company obtains funding from the contracts and grants it obtains from various agencies of the U.S. Government to support its research and development activities. Currently, the Company has one contract with an expiration date of December 30, 2020 and one grant with an expiration date of April 30, 2018, which in combination provide for potential future aggregate research and development funding for specific projects of approximately $17.5 million. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the contract was amended to increase its funding by approximately $10.1 million, which also extended the period of performance of this contract from June 30, 2020 to December 30, 2020.

The funded amount includes, among other things, options that may or may not be exercised at the U.S. Government’s discretion. Moreover, the contract and grant contain customary terms and conditions including the U.S. Government’s right to terminate or restructure a grant for convenience at any time. As such, we may not utilize all available funds under the contract and/or grant.

4. Financial Instruments

2016 Warrant
On September 2, 2016, in connection with the entry into the Loan Agreement (see Note 7 to the financial statements for additional information), the Company issued a warrant (the Warrant) to the Lender to purchase a number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to $4,000,000 divided by the lower of (i) $2.29 per share and (ii) the subscription price paid in connection with the Rights Offering. The Warrant provides for weighted average anti-dilution protection and is exercisable in whole or in part for ten (10) years from the date of issuance. The subscription price paid was $1.50 in connection with the Rights Offering; accordingly, the exercise price of the Warrant has been set at $1.50 per share.

The Company accounted for the Warrant in accordance with the authoritative guidance which requires that free-standing derivative financial instruments with certain anti-dilution features be classified as assets or liabilities at the time of the transaction, and recorded at their fair value. Any changes in the fair value of the derivative instruments are reported in earnings or loss as long as the derivative contracts are classified as assets or liabilities. Accordingly, the Company classified the Warrant as a liability and reported the change in fair value in the statement of operations.

On September 2, 2016, the issuance date of the Warrant, the fair value of the liability classified Warrant was $5.8 million. The Company applied a Monte Carlo Simulation-model to calculate the fair value of the liability classified Warrant using the following assumptions: risk free interest rate of 1.60%; no dividend yield; an expected life of 10 years; and a volatility factor of 80%. The Company compared the Monte Carlo simulation model calculation to a Black-Scholes model calculation. These models generated substantially equal fair values for the Warrant. As such, the Company utilized a Black-Scholes model for March 31, 2017 to determine the fair value of the Warrant.

As of March 31, 2017, the fair value of the Warrant was $7.4 million. A Black Scholes model was applied to calculate the fair value of the liability classified Warrant using the following assumptions: risk free interest rate of 2.38%; no dividend yield; an expected life of 9.42 years; and a volatility factor of 80%.

For the quarter-ended March 31, 2017, the Company recorded a loss of $626,209 as a result of a net increase in fair value in the liability classified Warrant since its last valuation on December 31, 2016. 

Rights Offering
On November 16, 2016, the Company completed a rights offering (the “Rights Offering”), pursuant to which it raised approximately $35.3 million in gross proceeds through the sale of 23,523,195 shares of its common stock. The Rights Offering was made pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-1 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and declared effective by the SEC on October 21, 2016. As part of the Rights Offering, each stockholder of the Company received subscription right for each share of common stock owned as of the record date of October 12, 2016. Each subscription right entitled its holder to invest $0.65 towards the purchase of shares of the Company's common stock at a subscription price equal to the lower of$1.50 or 85% of the volume weighted average price of Company shares during market hours on the expiration date of the Rights Offering. The Rights Offering expired at 5:00 pm, New York City time, on November 8, 2016. Through basic subscriptions and oversubscriptions, the Rights Offering was fully subscribed. The subscription price was set at $1.50. The Company used the net proceeds of the

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Rights Offering, together with proceeds from the Loan Agreement and cash on hand, to fully satisfy PharmAthene's claim under the plan of reorganization.

Rights Offering - Backstop Agreement
On October 13, 2016, in connection with the Rights Offering as discussed above, the Company entered into an investment agreement or “backstop agreement”, with an affiliate of MacAndrews & Forbes Incorporated ("M&F"), and certain other backstop parties (the “Backstop Parties”). Under the terms of the backstop agreement, the Backstop Parties agreed to purchase, pursuant to a separate private placement, a number of shares of common stock equal to the numbers of shares that not subscribed for in the Rights Offering. The backstop agreement provided that the subscription price for the Backstop Parties would be equal to the subscription price applicable to all shareholders under the Rights Offering. Because the Rights Offering was fully subscribed, the Backstop Parties were not required to draw on such commitment. The Company issued 708,530 shares to Backstop Parties in payment of the five percent backstop fee ($1,764,240) payable to the Backstop Parties in connection with the backstop agreement. When shares were issued to the Backstop Parties in payment of the backstop fee, the stock price of SIGA common stock was $2.49 per share (the closing price of the Company’s common stock on November 16, 2016). The fair value of the shares issued in satisfaction of the backstop fee was expensed to the income statement in 2016. There are no remaining payment obligations to the Backstop Parties under the Backstop Agreement.


5. Per Share Data

The Company incurred losses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 and as a result, equity instruments are excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings (loss) per share as the effect of such shares is anti-dilutive. The weighted average number of equity instruments excluded consist of:
 
Three months ended March 31,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
Stock Options
1,709,967

 
1,895,571

 
Stock-Settled Stock Appreciation Rights
360,031

 
361,647

 
Restricted Stock Units
1,307,464

 
638,045

(1
)
Warrants
2,690,950

 

 

The appreciation of each stock-settled stock appreciation right was capped at a determined maximum value. As a result, the weighted average number shown in the table above for stock-settled stock appreciation rights reflects the weighted average maximum number of shares that could be issued.


(1) Included 363,337 restricted stock units that had vested but had not converted into common stock.

6. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying value of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and cash equivalents, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximates fair value due to the relatively short maturity of these instruments. Common stock warrants which are classified as liabilities are recorded at their fair market value as of each reporting period.

The measurement of fair value requires the use of techniques based on observable and unobservable inputs. Observable inputs reflect market data obtained from independent sources, while unobservable inputs reflect our market assumptions. The inputs create the following fair value hierarchy:

Level 1 – Quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets.

Level 2 – Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations where inputs are observable or where significant value drivers are observable.

Level 3 – Instruments where significant value drivers are unobservable to third parties.

The Company uses model-derived valuations where certain inputs are unobservable to third parties to determine the fair value of certain common stock warrants on a recurring basis and classify such liability classified warrants in Level 3. On September 2,

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2016, the date of issuance of the current liability classified warrant, the Company used a Monte Carlo simulation model to calculate the fair market value of the warrant. The Company compared the Monte Carlo simulation model calculation to a Black-Scholes model calculation. These models generated substantially equal values. As such, the Company utilized a Black-Scholes model for March 31, 2017, consisting of the following variables: (i) the closing price of SIGA’s common stock; (ii) the expected remaining life of the liability classified warrant; (iii) the expected volatility using a weighted-average of historical volatilities from a combination of SIGA and comparable companies; and (iv) the risk-free market rate. At March 31, 2017, the fair value of liability classified warrant is $7.4 million.

At March 31, 2017, the fair value of the debt was $71.8 million and the carrying value of the debt was $67.7 million. The Company used a discounted cash flow model to estimate the fair value of the debt by applying a discount rate to future payments expected to be made as set forth in the Loan Agreement.  The fair value of the loan was measured using level 3 inputs.  The discount rate was determined using market participant assumptions.  This valuation required significant judgment. 

There were no transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy for the three months ended March 31, 2017.

The following table presents changes in the liability classified warrant measured at fair value using Level 3 inputs:

 
Fair Value Measurements of Level 3 liability classified warrant
Warrant liability at December 31, 2016
$
6,727,409

Increase in fair value of warrant liability
626,209

Warrant liability at March 31, 2017
$
7,353,618




7. Debt

On September 2, 2016, the Company entered into a loan and security agreement (as amended from time to time, the “Loan Agreement”) with OCM Strategic Credit SIGTEC Holdings, LLC (“Lender”), pursuant to which the Company received $80 million on November 16, 2016 having satisfied certain pre-conditions. Such $80 million had been placed in an escrow account on September 30, 2016 (the “Escrow Funding Date”). Prior to the Escrow Release Date (November 16, 2016), the Company did not have access to, or any ownership interest in, the escrow account. Until the Escrow Release Date occurred, the Company did not have an obligation to make any payments under the Loan Agreement, no security was granted under the Loan Agreement and no affirmative or negative covenants or events of default were effective under the Loan Agreement. Amounts were held in the escrow account until the satisfaction of certain conditions including the closing of the Rights Offering on November 16, 2016. As part of the satisfaction of the PharmAthene claim, funds were released from the escrow account (the date on which such transfer occurred, the “Escrow Release Date”).

The Loan Agreement provides for a first-priority senior secured term loan facility in the aggregate principal amount of $80,000,000 (the “Term Loan”), of which (i) $25,000,000 was placed in a reserve account (the “Reserve Account”) only to be utilized to pay interest on the Term Loan as it becomes due; (ii) an additional $5,000,000 was also placed in the Reserve Account and up to the full amount of such $5,000,000 may be withdrawn after June 30, 2018 upon the satisfaction of certain conditions, provided that any of such amount is required to fund any interest to the extent any interest in excess of the aforementioned $25,000,000 is due and owing and any of such $5,000,000 remains in the Reserve Account; and (iii) $50,000,000 (net of fees and expenses then due and owing to the Lender) was paid to PharmAthene as part of the final payment to satisfy the PharmAthene claim. Interest on the Term Loan is at a per annum rate equal to the Adjusted LIBOR rate plus 11.50%, subject to adjustments as set forth in the Loan Agreement. At March 31, 2017, the effective interest rate on the Term Loan was 18.30%. The Company incurred approximately $3.6 million of interest expense during the three months ended March 31, 2017, of which $2.5 million was paid from restricted cash and the remaining $1.1 million accreted to the Term Loan balance.

The Term Loan shall mature on the earliest to occur of (i) the four year anniversary of the Escrow Release Date, and (ii) the acceleration of certain obligations pursuant to the Loan Agreement. At maturity, $80 million of principal will be repaid, and an additional $4 million will be paid (see below). Prior to maturity, there are no scheduled principal payments.


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Through the three and one-half year anniversary of the Escrow Release Date, any prepayment of the Term Loan is subject to a make-whole provision in which interest payments related to the prepaid amount are due (subject to a discount of treasury rate plus 0.50%).

In connection with the Term Loan, the Company has granted the Lender a lien on and security interest in all of the Company’s right, title and interest in substantially all of the Company’s tangible and intangible assets, including all intellectual property.

The Loan Agreement contains customary representations and warranties and customary affirmative and negative covenants. These covenants, among other things, require a minimum cash balance throughout the term of the Term Loan and the achievement of regulatory milestones by certain dates, and contain certain limitations on the ability of the Company to incur unreimbursed research and development expenditures over a certain threshold, make capital expenditures over a certain threshold, incur indebtedness, dispose of assets outside of the ordinary course of business and enter into certain merger or consolidation transactions. The aforementioned minimum cash requirement will be $15 million until June 30, 2017 and will reduce to $10 million for the remainder of 2017 and reduce to $5 million for 2018 until the earlier of (i) December 31, 2018 and (ii) 45 days after FDA approval of TPOXX®; thereafter, the minimum cash requirement will be $20 million.

The Loan Agreement includes customary events of default, including, among others: (i) non-payment of amounts due thereunder, (ii) the material inaccuracy of representations or warranties made thereunder, (iii) non-compliance with covenants thereunder, (iv) non-payment of amounts due under, or the acceleration of, other material indebtedness of the Company and (v) bankruptcy or insolvency events. Upon the occurrence and during the continuance of an event of default under the Loan Agreement, the interest rate may increase by 2.00% per annum above the rate of interest otherwise in effect, and the Lenders would be entitled to accelerate the maturity of the Company’s outstanding obligations thereunder.

As of March 31, 2017, the Company is in compliance with the Loan Agreement covenants.

In connection with the Loan Agreement, the Company incurred $8.2 million of costs (including interest on amounts held in the escrow account between September 30, 2016 and November 15, 2016). Furthermore, an additional $4 million will become payable when principal of the Term Loan is repaid. As part of the Company's entry into the Loan Agreement, the Company issued the Warrant with a fair market value of $5.8 million. The fair value of the Warrant, as well as costs related to the Term Loan issuance, are recorded as deductions to the Term Loan balance on the Balance Sheet. These amounts are being amortized using the effective interest method over the life of the related Term Loan. The $4 million that will be paid when principal is repaid is being accreted to the Term Loan balance each quarter on a per diem basis. As of March 31, 2017, the Term Loan balance is $67.7 million.

8. Related Party Transactions

A member of the Company’s Board of Directors is a member of the Company’s outside counsel. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, and 2016, the Company incurred costs of $78,000, and $363,000, respectively, related to services provided by the outside counsel. On March 31, 2017, the Company’s outstanding payables included $35,000 payable to the outside counsel.

On October 13, 2016, in connection with the Rights Offering as discussed above, the Company entered into the Backstop Agreement with an affiliate of M&F and the other Backstop Parties. Under the terms of the Backstop Agreement, the Backstop Parties agreed to purchase, pursuant to a separate private placement, a number of shares of common stock equal to the numbers of shares that would have not been subscribed for in the Rights Offering. The Backstop Agreement provided that the subscription price for the Backstop Parties would be equal to the subscription price applicable to all shareholders under the Rights Offering. Because the Rights Offering was fully subscribed, the Backstop Parties were not required to draw on such commitment. When shares were issued to the Backstop Parties in payment of the backstop fee, the stock price of SIGA common stock was $2.49 per share (the closing price of the Company’s common stock on November 16, 2016). The fair value of the shares issued in satisfaction of the backstop fee was expensed to the income statement in 2016. There are no remaining payment obligations to the Backstop Parties under the Backstop Agreement.

In October 2012, the Company funded a letter of credit and deposit to take advantage of a lease for office space secured by an affiliate of M&F from a third party landlord on behalf of the Company. Pursuant to such letter of credit, in January 2013 the Company entered into a sublease in which the Company will pay all costs associated with the lease, including rent. All payments made by the Company pursuant to the sublease will either be directly or indirectly made to the third-party landlord and not retained by M&F or any affiliate. The sublease allows for a free rent period of five months beginning April 1, 2013; subsequent to the free rent period, monthly rent payments are $60,000 for the first five years and $63,000 for the next two years. Upon expiration on September 30, 2020, the sublease and lease provides for two consecutive five year renewal options.



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9. Inventory

Due to the deferral of revenue under the BARDA Contract (see Note 3 for additional information), amounts that would be otherwise recorded as cost of goods sold for delivered courses are recorded as deferred costs on the balance sheet. The value of inventory represents the costs incurred to manufacture TPOXX® under the BARDA Contract. Additional costs incurred to complete production of courses of TPOXX® will be recorded as inventory and reclassified to deferred costs upon delivery to the extent related revenue is deferred.

Inventory consisted of the following at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016:
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Work in-process
$
13,361,468

 
$
18,916,084

Finished goods
5,758,087

 
7,293,880

Inventory
$
19,119,555

 
$
26,209,964


For the three months ended March 31, 2017, research and development expenses include inventory write-downs of approximately $686,000.

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10. Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment consisted of the following at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Leasehold improvements
$
2,542,043

 
$
2,542,044

Computer equipment
762,604

 
770,479

Furniture and fixtures
455,220

 
455,220

 
3,759,867

 
3,767,743

Less - accumulated depreciation
(3,496,565
)
 
(3,468,266
)
Property, plant and equipment, net
$
263,302

 
$
299,477


Depreciation and amortization expense on property, plant, and equipment was $36,175 and $44,452 for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 respectively.

11. Accrued Expenses

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consisted of the following at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016:
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Bonus
$
676,580

 
$
2,357,194

Professional fees
393,252

 
481,641

Vacation
312,414

 
262,664

Other (primarily R&D vendors and CMOs)
1,566,103

 
1,483,253

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
$
2,948,349

 
$
4,584,752


12. Income Taxes

Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 740, Income Taxes requires that a valuation allowance be established when it is more likely than notthat all or a portion of deferred tax assets will not be realized. A review of all available positive and negative evidence needs to be considered, including company's performance, the market environment in which the company operates, the utilization of past tax credits, length of carryback and carryforward periods, existing contracts, and unsettled circumstances that, if unfavorably resolved, would adversely affect future operations and profit levels in the future years. Based on the available evidence, the Company continues to conclude that its deferred tax assets are not realizable on a more-likely-than-not basis.

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company recorded an income tax provision of $115,000 on a pre-tax loss of $8.5 million. The effective tax rate differs from the statutory rate as no income tax benefit was recorded for current year operating losses due to the Company’s assessment regarding tax realizability of its deferred tax asset.

13. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

On January 26, 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. The guidance removes Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test, which requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation. A goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. All other goodwill impairment guidance will remain largely unchanged. Entities will continue to have the option to perform a qualitative assessment to determine if a quantitative impairment test is necessary. The same one-step impairment test will be applied to goodwill at all reporting units, even those with zero or negative carrying amounts. The revised guidance will be applied prospectively, and is effective for calendar year-end in 2020. Early adoption is permitted for any impairment tests performed after January 1, 2017. The Company believes adoption of ASU 2017-04 will not have a significant impact on its consolidated financial statements.

On November 17, 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash, a consensus of the FASB’s Emerging Issues Task Force. The new standard requires that the statement of cash flows explain the change during

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the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Entities will also be required to reconcile such total to amounts on the balance sheet and disclose the nature of the restrictions. The standard is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The guidance requires application using a retrospective transition method. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-18 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

On August 26, 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016­-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230), a consensus of the FASB’s Emerging Issues Task Force. The new guidance is intended to reduce diversity in practice in how certain transactions are classified in the statement of cash flows. The standard is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, provided that all of the amendments are adopted in the same period. The guidance requires application using a retrospective transition method. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-15 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB amended the existing accounting standards for stock-based compensation, ASU 2016-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. The amendments impact several aspects of accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, forfeitures, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. The Company adopted the amendments in first quarter of 2017. Prior to adoption of ASU 2016-09, tax attributes related to stock option windfall deductions were not recorded until they resulted in a reduction of cash tax payable. As of December 31, 2016, the excluded windfall deductions for federal and state purposes were $1.6 million. Upon adoption of ASU 2016-09, the Company recognized the excluded windfall deductions as a deferred tax asset with a corresponding offset to valuation allowance.

In regards to the forfeiture policy election, we will continue to estimate the number of awards expected to be forfeited.

On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02 Leases, which relates to the accounting of leasing transactions. This standard requires a lessee to record on the balance sheet the assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by leases with lease terms of more than 12 months. In addition, this standard requires both lessees and lessors to disclose certain key information about lease transactions. This standard will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-02 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

In August 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standard Update (ASU) No. 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements - Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40) Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity's Ability to Continue as a Going Concern. This ASU requires management to assess whether there is substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern and, if so, disclose that fact. Management is also required to evaluate and disclose whether its plans alleviate that doubt. This ASU states that, when making this assessment, management should consider relevant conditions or events that are known or reasonably knowable on the date the financial statements are issued or available to be issued. This ASU is effective for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016 and interim periods thereafter, and early adoption is permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2014-15 and for adoption impact see Note 1 to the financial statements under “liquidity”.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). ASU No. 2014-09 supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in Topic 605, Revenue Recognition, and most industry-specific revenue recognition guidance throughout the Industry Topics of the Accounting Standards Codification. Additionally, this update supersedes some cost guidance included in Subtopic 605-35, Revenue Recognition-Construction-Type and Production-Type Contracts. The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. It is effective for the first interim period within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and early adoption is permitted for the first interim periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The Company is assessing the potential impact of the variable consideration related to milestones and other payments received as well as the impact of the potential replacement obligation for courses already delivered to BARDA. The Company will continue to assess the impact of ASU 2014-09.

14. Commitments and Contingencies

After several years of proceedings in litigation initiated by PharmAthene in 2006, the Delaware Court of Chancery on August 8, 2014 issued an opinion and order in which it determined, among other things, that PharmAthene was entitled to a lump sum damages award for its lost profits including interest and fees, based on SIGA’s contract with BARDA for the purchase of 2 million courses of TPOXX® which was allegedly anticipated as of December 2006. On September 16, 2014, as a consequence of SIGA’s chapter 11 filing, the legal proceedings with PharmAthene were stayed (see Note 1 to the financial statements), except that the

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parties agreed by stipulation approved by the Court on October 8, 2014 that the litigation could proceed. On January 15, 2015, the Delaware Court of Chancery entered its Final Order and Judgment (the Final Order and Judgment) awarding PharmAthene approximately $195 million, including pre-judgment interest up to January 15, 2015 (the “Outstanding Judgment”). On December 23, 2015 the Delaware Supreme Court affirmed the Outstanding Judgment. Pursuant to the Final Order and Judgment, SIGA also was liable to PharmAthene for $30,663.89 per day in post-judgment interest. On a series of dates up to and including a final payment on November 16, 2016, the Company paid PharmAthene an aggregate of $217 million to fully satisfy the Outstanding Judgment, including post-judgment interest, in accordance with the bankruptcy plan of reorganization.

From time to time, we may be involved in a variety of claims, suits, investigations and proceedings arising from the ordinary course of our business, collections claims, breach of contract claims, labor and employment claims, tax and other matters. Although such claims, suits, investigations and proceedings are inherently uncertain and their results cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the resolution of such current pending matters, if any, will not have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flow. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of legal costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes to those statements and other financial information appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. In addition to historical information, the following discussion and other parts of this Quarterly Report contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties.
 
Overview
 
We are a company specializing in the development and commercialization of solutions for serious unmet medical needs and biothreats. Our lead product is TPOXX®, an orally administered antiviral drug that targets orthopoxvirus infections, including smallpox. While TPOXX® is not yet approved as safe or effective by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, it is a novel small-molecule drug that is being delivered to the Strategic National Stockpile under Project Bioshield.

Closing of Chapter 11 Case

On April 12, 2016, the Company emerged from chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code when the Company's plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) became effective, and on December 22, 2016 the Company's chapter 11 case was closed by the Bankruptcy Court. Under the Plan, the Company fully paid all of its claims. The Company did not apply the provision of fresh start accounting as ownership of existing shares of the Company's common stock remained unaltered by the Plan.

Prior to the effective date of the Plan (April 12, 2016), the Company was operating its business as a “debtor-in-possession”. The Company had filed on September 16, 2014 a voluntary petition for relief under chapter 11 of Title 11 of the United States Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York (the “Bankruptcy Court”) chapter 11 Case Number 14-12623 (SHL). The chapter 11 case preserved the Company's ability to satisfy its commitments under the BARDA Contract (as defined in Note 3 to the financial statements) and preserved its operations, which likely would have been jeopardized by the enforcement of a judgment stemming from the Company's litigation with PharmAthene, Inc. (“PharmAthene”) (see “PharmAthene Litigation” below). While operating as a debtor-in-possession under chapter 11, the Company pursued an appeal of the Delaware Court of Chancery Final Order and Judgment, without having to post a bond.
    
PharmAthene Litigation
    
On November 16, 2016, the Company satisfied the Outstanding Judgment (defined in Note 14 to the financial statements) owed to PharmAthene in connection with the Company's litigation with PharmAthene. In total, PharmAthene was paid $217 million in connection with the Outstanding Judgment. See Note 14 to the financial statements for details related to the litigation.

Liquidity

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern and contemplate the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company is not entitled to receive any additional procurement-related payments under the current BARDA Contract (Note 3) until FDA approval of TPOXX® has been achieved and until a cumulative 2 million courses of TPOXX® have been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile. Upon meeting these requirements, the Company is entitled to a $41 million hold back payment under the

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BARDA Contract. Based on a targeted NDA filing for TPOXX® by the end of 2017, it is currently anticipated that the Company will be eligible to receive the $41 million hold back payment in the second half of 2018.

In the event that the Company does not receive a substantial portion of the hold back payment by the third quarter of 2018, then, based on currently forecasted operating costs, the Company will require additional sources of funding to continue operations and prevent an event of default under the Term Loan (Note 7). In this case, the Company would seek to increase cash liquidity by: raising proceeds through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, or the modification of the existing BARDA Contract; significantly reducing its operating expenses; or modifying the terms of the Loan Agreement. There can be no assurance that the Company will cumulatively deliver 2 million courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile, or that TPOXX® will receive FDA approval on a timely basis, if at all. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the Company would be able to increase cash liquidity, if needed, through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, the modification of the existing BARDA Contract, or a significant reduction of its operating expenses or operations, or that the lenders would agree to modify the Term Loan Agreement, if needed.

Lead Product - TPOXX®

On May 13, 2011, SIGA signed the BARDA Contract pursuant to which we agreed to deliver two million courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile. The BARDA Contract is worth approximately $472 million, including $409.8 million for manufacture and delivery of 1.7 million courses of TPOXX® and $62 million of potential reimbursements related to development and supportive activities (the “Base Contract”). Under the Base Contract, BARDA has agreed to buy from SIGA 1.7 million courses of TPOXX®. Additionally, SIGA expects to contribute to BARDA 300,000 courses at no additional cost to BARDA.


In addition to the Base Contract, the BARDA Contract also contains various options that, if exercisable at BARDA: would result in a $50 million payment to the Company in the event of FDA approval for extension to 84-month expiry for TPOXX® (from 38 month expiry as required in the Base Contract); would fund up to $58.3 million of development and supportive activities such as work on a smallpox prophylaxis indication for TPOXX®; and/or would fund $14.4 million of production-related activities related to warm-base manufacturing. In 2015, BARDA exercised two options related to extending the indication of the drug to the geriatric and pediatric populations. The stated value of these exercises was minimal. BARDA may not exercise additional options in the future. Options are exercisable by BARDA at its sole discretion. BARDA has indicated that it will evaluate, after the FDA's review and evaluation of stability data, the Company's request that BARDA exercise the option for the $50 million payment to the Company in the event of FDA approval of 84-month expiry for TPOXX®.

The BARDA Contract expires in September 2020.    

For courses of TPOXX® that are physically delivered to the Strategic Stockpile, the Company has replacement obligations, at no cost to BARDA, in the event that the final version of TPOXX® approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) is different from any course of TPOXX® that has been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile or if TPOXX® does not meet any specific label claims, fails release testing or does not meet 38 month expiry period (from time of delivery to the Strategic Stockpile), or if TPOXX® is recalled or deemed to be recalled for any reason.

We believe TPOXX® is among the first new small-molecule drugs delivered to the Strategic Stockpile under Project BioShield. TPOXX® is an investigational product that is not currently approved by FDA as a treatment of smallpox or any other indication. FDA has designated TPOXX® for “fast-track” status, creating a path for expedited FDA review and eventual regulatory approval.

    
Critical Accounting Estimates
 
The methods, estimates and judgments we use in applying our accounting policies have a significant impact on the results we report in our consolidated financial statements, which we discuss under the heading “Results of Operations” following this section of our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Some of our accounting policies require us to make difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain. Our most critical accounting estimates include the valuation of stock-based awards including options and warrants granted or issued by the Company, revenue recognition, income taxes, and realization of deferred tax assets.

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Results of Operations
 
Three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016
 
Revenues from research and development contracts and grants for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, were $5.2 million and $1.3 million, respectively. The increase in revenue of $3.9 million, or 310%, reflects an increase in revenues from our federal contracts supporting the development of TPOXX. Revenues from federal contracts supporting the development of TPOXX have increased because the number and scale of active studies involving TPOXX have increased in comparison to the prior year.

Selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A”) for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, were $2.9 million and $2.7 million, respectively, reflecting an increase of $214,000, or 8%. The increase is primarily attributable to a $884,000 increase in employee compensation expense, partially offset by a $621,000 decrease in professional service fees. The increase in employee compensation expense is due to: an increase in senior management headcount; normalization of the bonus accrual (uncertainty related to the chapter 11 case in 2016 resulted in a below-trend bonus accrual in the first three months of 2016); and an increase of $112,000 in stock-based compensation expense. The decrease in professional service fees is primarily due to the satisfaction of the PharmAthene liability, which has resulted in a decrease in legal fees.
    
Research and development expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 were $6.4 million and $2.5 million, respectively, reflecting an increase of $3.8 million, or 150.8%. The increase is primarily attributable to an increase of $3.5 million in direct vendor-related expenses supporting the development of TPOXX, and a net expense of $536,000 related to inventory write-down. The $536,000 expense relates to a $686,000 inventory write-down, partially offset by contractual CMO payments to be received in connection with the inventory write-down.    

Patent expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 were $241,000 and $220,000, respectively. These expenses reflect our ongoing efforts to protect our lead drug candidates in varied geographic territories.

Interest expense on the PharmAthene liability for the three months ended March 31, 2016 was $2.9 million. This amount represented interest expense related to post-judgment interest on the Delaware Court of Chancery Final Order and Judgment. On November 16, 2016, the Company fully paid the PharmAthene liability, and thus there was no interest expense on the PharmAthene liability for the three months ended March 31, 2017. See Note 14 to the financial statements for additional information.
    
Changes in the fair value of liability classified Warrant are recorded as gains or losses on the statement of operations. For the three months ended March 31, 2017, we recorded a loss of $626,000. See Notes 4 to the consolidated financial statements for further information.

Interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2017 is $3.6 million. This amount represents interest expense on the Term Loan. The $3.6 million interest expense includes a $2.5 million cash payment from restricted cash, and $1.1 million of accretion of unamortized costs and fees related to the Term Loan balance.

Reorganization items for the three months ended March 31, 2016 was $3.4 million. These expenses were in connection with the chapter 11 case. The Company emerged from chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code on April 12, 2016.
    
For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 we incurred pre-tax losses of $8.5 million and $10.4 million and a corresponding income tax expense of $115,000 and $11,000, respectively. The effective tax rate during the period ended March 31, 2017 was (1.4)%. Our effective tax rate for the period ended March 31, 2017 differs from the statutory rate as no income tax benefit was recorded for current year operating losses due to the Company’s assessment regarding tax realizability of its deferred tax assets.

The recognition of a valuation allowance for deferred taxes requires management to make estimates and judgments about our future profitability which are inherently uncertain. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. If the current estimates of future taxable income change, the Company’s assessment regarding the realization of deferred tax assets could change. Future changes in the estimated amount of deferred taxes expected to be realized will be reflected in the Company’s financial statements in the period the estimate is changed with a corresponding adjustment to operating results. Changes in estimates may occur often and can have a significant favorable or unfavorable impact on the Company’s operating results from period to period.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
As of March 31, 2017, we had $30.1 million in cash and cash equivalents compared with $28.7 million at December 31, 2016. As of March 31, 2017, the Company had $24.9 million of restricted cash. The restricted cash is utilized to pay interest on the Term Loan as it becomes due and $5 million of the restricted cash may be withdrawn after June 30, 2018 upon the satisfaction of certain conditions. See Note 7 for additional information.

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern and contemplate the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company is not entitled to receive any additional procurement-related payments under the current BARDA Contract (Note 3) until FDA approval of TPOXX® has been achieved and until a cumulative 2 million courses of TPOXX® have been delivered to the Strategic Stockpile. Upon meeting these requirements, the Company is entitled to a $41 million hold back payment under the BARDA Contract. Based on a targeted NDA filing for TPOXX® by the end of 2017, it is currently anticipated that the Company will be eligible to receive the $41 million hold back payment in the second half of 2018.

In the event that the Company does not receive a substantial portion of the hold back payment by the third quarter of 2018, then, based on currently forecasted operating costs, the Company will require additional sources of funding to continue operations and prevent an event of default under the Term Loan (Note 7). In this case, the Company would seek to increase cash liquidity by: raising proceeds through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, or the modification of the existing BARDA Contract; significantly reducing its operating expenses; or modifying the terms of the Loan Agreement. There can be no assurance that the Company will cumulatively deliver 2 million courses of TPOXX® to the Strategic Stockpile, or that TPOXX® will receive FDA approval on a timely basis, if at all. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the Company would be able to increase cash liquidity, if needed, through a financing, a new contract for TPOXX® or any other product, a sale of assets, the modification of the existing BARDA Contract, or a significant reduction of its operating expenses or operations, or that the lenders would agree to modify the Term Loan Agreement, if needed.
    
Change in Provisional Dosage of TPOXX
As discussed in Note 3 to the financial statements, the Company expects to incur significant production costs due to the change in provisional dosage of TPOXX®.

Operating Activities
Net cash provided by (used in) operations for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 were $1.6 million and $(8.6) million, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company received $8.5 million from BARDA for product delivery, offset by recurring operating costs and $1.3 million of payments to contract manufacturing organizations (“CMOs”) for the manufacture and related support of TPOXX®. For the three months ended March 31, 2016, cash usage was primarily related to recurring operating costs, costs attendant to the administration of the Company's chapter 11case and $5.8 million of payments to CMOs for the manufacture and related support of TPOXX®.
    
Investing Activities
There was no investing activity for the three months ended March 31, 2017. For the three months ended March 31, 2016, cash usage of $8,000 related to capital expenditures.

Financing Activities
Net cash used by financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2017 was $193,000. During the first quarter of 2017, the Company repurchased $193,000 of common stock to meet minimum statutory tax withholding requirements for restricted shares issued to employees.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

For discussion regarding the impact of accounting standards that were recently issued but not yet effective, on the Company's condensed consolidated financial statements, see Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 13 - Recently Issued Accounting Standards.

19

Table of Contents


Safe Harbor Statement

Certain statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including certain statements contained in “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended, including statements relating to the progress of SIGA’s development programs and time lines for bringing products to market and the enforceability of the BARDA Contract. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties and SIGA cautions you that any forward-looking information provided by or on behalf of SIGA is not a guarantee of future performance. SIGA’s actual results could differ materially from those anticipated by such forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, some of which are beyond SIGA’s control, including, but not limited to, (i) the risk that potential products that appear promising to SIGA or its collaborators cannot be shown to be efficacious or safe in subsequent pre-clinical or clinical trials, (ii) the risk that SIGA or its collaborators will not obtain appropriate or necessary governmental approvals to market these or other potential products, (iii) the risk that SIGA may not be able to obtain anticipated funding for its development projects or other needed funding, including from anticipated governmental contracts and grants (iv) the risk that SIGA may not complete performance under the BARDA Contract on schedule or in accordance with contractual terms, (v) the risk that SIGA may not be able to secure or enforce sufficient legal rights in its products, including intellectual property protection, (vi) the risk that any challenge to SIGA’s patent and other property rights, if adversely determined, could affect SIGA’s business and, even if determined favorably, could be costly, (vii) the risk that regulatory requirements applicable to SIGA’s products may result in the need for further or additional testing or documentation that will delay or prevent seeking or obtaining needed approvals to market these products, (viii) the risk that one or more protests could be filed and upheld in whole or in part or other governmental action taken, in either case leading to a delay of performance under the BARDA Contract or other governmental contracts, (ix) the risk that the BARDA Contract is modified or canceled at the request or requirement of the U.S. government, (x) the risk that the volatile and competitive nature of the biotechnology industry may hamper SIGA’s efforts to develop or market its products, (xi) the risk that changes in domestic and foreign economic and market conditions may affect SIGA’s ability to advance its research or may affect its products adversely, (xii) the effect of federal, state, and foreign regulation, including drug regulation and international trade regulation, on SIGA’s businesses, (xiii) the risk that the U.S. Government's responses (including inaction) to the national and global economic situation may affect SIGA's business adversely, and (xix) the risk that some amounts received and recorded as deferred revenue ultimately many not be recognized as revenue. All such forward-looking statements are current only as of the date on which such statements were made. SIGA does not undertake any obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which any such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

More detailed information about SIGA and risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements, including the forward-looking statements in this presentation, is set forth in SIGA’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and SIGA’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, and in other documents that SIGA has filed with the SEC. SIGA urges investors and security holders to read those documents free of charge at the SEC’s Web site at http://www.sec.gov. Forward-looking statements are current only as of the date on which such statements were made, and except for our ongoing obligations under the United States of America federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
Our investment portfolio may include cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. Our main investment objectives are the preservation of investment capital and the maximization of after-tax returns on our investment portfolio. We believe that our investment policy is conservative, both in the duration of our investments and the credit quality of the investments we hold. We do not utilize derivative financial instruments, derivative commodity instruments or other market risk sensitive instruments, positions or transactions to manage exposure to interest rate changes. Accordingly, we believe that, while the securities we hold are subject to changes in the financial standing of the issuer of such securities and our interest income is sensitive to changes in the general level of U.S. interest rates, we are not subject to any material risks arising from changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, commodity prices, equity prices or other market changes that affect market risk sensitive instruments.

20



Item 4. Controls and Procedures
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2017. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. Management recognizes that any disclosure controls and procedures no matter how well designed and operated, can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.
 
Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Office and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of March 31, 2017 at a reasonable level of assurance.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended March 31, 2017 that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. 

21

Table of Contents


PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings
 
From time to time, we may be involved in a variety of claims, suits, investigations and proceedings arising from the ordinary course of our business, collections claims, breach of contract claims, labor and employment claims, tax and other matters. Although such claims, suits, investigations and proceedings are inherently uncertain and their results cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the resolution of such current pending matters, if any, will not have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flow. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of legal costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.


Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
Our results of operations and financial conditions are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties described in our 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year-ended December 31, 2016.

Item 2. Unregistered Sale of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

None.

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities

None.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

No disclosure is required pursuant to this item.

Item 5. Other Information
 
None.

22



Item 6. Exhibits
Exhibit
No.
 
Description
 
Amendment of Solicitation/Modification of Contract 0012, dated April 22, 2016, to Agreement, dated May 13, 2011, between the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and SIGA.
 
Amendment of Solicitation/Modification of Contract 0014, dated September 21, 2016, to Agreement, dated May 13, 2011, between the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and SIGA.
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS
 
XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema
101.CAL
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase
101.DEF
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase
101.LAB
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase
101.PRE
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

23


SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 
 
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
 
 
(Registrant)
 
 
 
Date:
May 4, 2017
By:
/s/ Daniel J. Luckshire
 
 
 
 
Daniel J. Luckshire
 
 
 
 
Executive Vice President and
 
 
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
 
 
 
(Principal Financial Officer and
 
 
 
Principal Accounting Officer) 

24
Exhibit


AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT
1. CONTRACT ID CODE
N/A
PAGE OF PAGES
1
2
2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO.
Modification 0012
3. EFFECTIVE DATE
See Block 16 C
4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO.
N/A
5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable)
N/A
6. ISSUED BY CODE
N/A
7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE
N/A
HHS/OS/ASPR/AMCG
330 Independence Avenue, SW.
Room G640
Washington, DC 20201
 
8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, State and ZIP Code)
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
35 E 62nd Street
New York, NY 10065
(X)
9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO.
 
9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11)
X
10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO.
HHSO100201100001C
10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13)
05/13/2011
CODE N/A
FACILITY CODE N/A
11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS


~ The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers ~ is extended, ~ is not extended.

Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation or as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing items 8 and 15, and returning ___________ copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment your desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be made by telegram or letter, provided each telegram or letter makes reference to the solicitation and this amendment, and is received prior to the opening hour and date specified.

12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA (If required)
2016 1992016.25103 -- Obligation amount: $4,813,378.00

13. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS DESCRIBED IN ITEM 14.
()
A. THIS CHANGE ORDER IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO: (Specify authority) THE CHANGES SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A.
 
 
B. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACT/ORDER IS MODIFIED TO REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES (such as changes in paying office, appropriation date, etc.) SET FORTH IN ITEM 14, PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF FAR 43.103(b).
X
C. THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENT IS ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO AUTHORITY OF:
FAR 52 243-2 – Changes – Cost Reimbursement and FAR 1 605-1 – Mutual Agreement of the Parties
 
D. OTHER (Specify type of modification and authority)
E. IMPORTANT: Contractor [] is not, [ X] is required to sign this document and return   1   copies to the issuing office.

14. DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION (Organized by UCF section headings, including solicitation/contract subject matter where feasible.)

PURPOSE:    This modification is to add additional funding under CLIN 0007 and update designated COR and Alternate COR.

FUNDS ALLOTED PRIOR TO MOD #12    $465,501,091.00
FUNDS ALLOTTED WITH MOD #12    $ 4,813,378.00
TOTAL FUNDS ALLOTED TO DATE    $470,314,469.00 (Changed)
EXPIRATION DATE    September 24, 2020 (Unchanged)
CONTRACT FUNDED THROUGH    September 24, 2020 (Unchanged)

Total contract value is changed from Not To Exceed $588,234,077.21 to Not To Exceed $593,047,455.21

Except as provided herein, all terms and conditions of the document referenced in Item 9A or 10A, as heretofore changed, remains unchanged and in full force and effect.
15A. NAME AND TITLE OF SIGNER (Type or print)
 
Dennis E. Hruby CSO
16A. NAME AND TITLE OF CONTRACTING OFFICER (Type or print)
 
Linda D. Luczak, Contracting Officer
15B. CONTRACTOR/OFFEROR

 /s/ Dennis E. Hruby
(Signature of person authorized to sign)
15C. DATE SIGNED
22 Apr 2016
16B. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

  /s/ Linda D. Luczak
(Signature of Contracting Officer)
16C. DATE SIGNED
4/22/16

NSN 7540-01-152-8070    OMB No 0990—0115    STANDARD FORM 30 (REV. 10-83)


Contract No.
HHSO100201100001C
Modification No.0012
Continuation Sheet
Block 14
Page 2 of 2

1)
The following revision is made to CLIN 0007 under this modification:
CLIN 0007 is revised from CPFF $42,031,228.44 (Est Cost: $39,652,102.19 & Fee $2,379,126.25) to CPFF $46,844.606.44 (Est. Cost: $44,193,024.83 & Fee $2,651,581.61), a total increase of $4,813,378 (Est. Cost: $4,540,922.64 & Fee $272,455.36). The amount of this increase to CLIN 0007 ($4,813,378) is being obligated under this modification.
The bid schedule table (under Section B) for CLIN 0007 is revised to read as follows:
CLIN#
Cost Type
Supply or Service
Estimated Cost
Fee
Total CPFF
7
CPFF
Supportive Studies (Clinical/Non-Clinical) to include, but not limited to stability, non-clinical, and clinical studies as described in Sections C.2,and C.4)
$44,193,024.83
$2,651,581.61
$46,844,606.44

2)
Update SECTION G, Article G.2. as follows and replace the designated COR and Alternate COR:
ARTICLE G.2. CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR)
The following Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) will represent the Government for the purpose of this contract:
Andrew [Drew] Albright
– Primary COR
Chia-Wei Tsai, PhD
– Alternate COR

As delegated by the Contracting Officer, the COR is responsible for: (1) monitoring the Contractor's technical progress, including the surveillance and assessment of performance and recommending to the Contracting Officer changes in requirements; (2) assisting the contracting Officer in interpreting the statement of work and any other technical performance requirements; (3) performing technical evaluation as required ; (4) performing technical inspections and acceptances required by this contract; and (5) assisting in the resolution of technical problems encountered during performance.
All other terms and conditions of contract HHS0100201100001C remain unchanged.
END OF MODIFICATION 0012 TO HHS0100201100001C



Exhibit
Contract No. HHSO100201100001C
Modification No.0014
Continuation Sheet
Block 14
Page 2 of 2





   AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT
1. CONTRACT ID CODE
PAGE OF PAGES
 
N/A
1
2
2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO
Modification 0014
3. EFFECTIVE DATE
     See Block 16 C
4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO
N/A
5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable)
           N/A
6. ISSUED BY CODE
N/A
7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE
N/A
HHS/OS/ASPR/AMCG
330 Independence Avenue, SW,
Room G640,
Washington, DC 20201

 

 
8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, State and ZIP Code)
(X )
9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO.
 
 
 
SIGA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
35 E 62nd Street
New York, NY 10065
 
9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11)


         
  
  X
10A.MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO.
                    HHSO100201100001C
 
 
10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13)
CODE N/A
FACILITY CODE N/A
 
05/13/2011
   11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS
~ The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers ~ is extended, ~ is not extended.
Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation or as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning        copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment, you desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be made by telegram or letter, provided each telegram or letter makes reference to the solicitation and this amendment, and is received prior to the opening hour and date specified.
12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA (If required)
2016.1992016.25103 – Obligation amount: $2,395,540.00
   13. THIS ITEM APPLIES ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS DESCRIBED IN ITEM 14.
   ( )
A. THIS CHANGE ORDER IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO: (Specify authority) THE CHANGES SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A.
 
 
 
B. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACT/ORDER IS MODIFIED TO REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES (such as changes in paying office, appropriation date, etc.) SET FORTH IN ITEM 14, PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF FAR 43.103(b).
X

C. THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENT IS ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO AUTHORITY OF:
 FAR 52.243-2 –Changes - Cost Reimbursement and FAR 1.605-1 - Mutual Agreement of the Parties
 
D. OTHER (Specify type of modification and authority)

E. IMPORTANT: Contractor [ ] is not, [ X] is required to sign this document and return _1_ copies to the issuing office.
14. DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION (Organized by UCF section headings, including solicitation/contract subject matter where feasible)

PURPOSE:   This modification is to add additional funding under CLIN 0007.

FUNDS ALLOTED PRIOR TO MOD #14 $470,314,469.00
FUNDS ALLOTTED WITH MOD #14 $ 2,006,219.00  
TOTAL FUNDS ALLOTED TO DATE $472,320,688.00 (Changed)
EXPIRATION DATE: September 24, 2020 (Unchanged)
CONTRACT FUNDED THROUGH September 24, 2020 (Unchanged)

Total contract value is changed from Not To Exceed $470,314,469.00 by $2,006,219.00 to $472,320,688.00.

Except as provided herein, all terms and conditions of the document referenced in Item 9A or 10A, as heretofore changed, remains unchanged and in full force and effect
15A. NAME AND TITLE OF SIGNER (Type or print)
       Dennis E. Hruby CSO
16A. NAME AND TITLE OF CONTRACTING OFFICER (Type or print)
        Linda D. Luczak, Contracting Officer
        
15B. CONTRACTOR/OFFEROR

/s/ Dennis E. Hruby
   (Signature of person authorized to sign)
15C. DATE SIGNED

      
16B. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

/s/ Linda D. Luczak   
   (Signature of Contracting Officer)
16C. DATE SIGNED

         
NSN 7540-01-152-8070    OMB No. 0990—0115 STANDARD FORM 30 (REV. 10-83)






1) The following revision is made to CLIN 0007 under this modification:

CLIN 0007 is revised from CPFF $46,844,606.44 (Est. Cost: $44,193,024.83 & Fee $2,651,581.61) to CPFF $48,850,825.44 (Est. Cost: $46,085,683.83 & Fee $2,765,141.61), a total increase of $2,006,219 (Est. Cost: $1,892,659 & Fee $113,560). The amount of this increase to CLIN 0007 ($2,006,219) is being obligated under this modification.

The bid schedule table (under Section B) for CLIN 0007 is revised to read as follows:

CLIN#
Cost Type
Supply or Service
Estimated Cost
Fee
Total CPFF
7
CPFF
Supportive Studies (Clinical/Non-Clinical) to include, but not limited to stability, non-clinical, and clinical studies as described in Sections C.2,and C.4)
$46,085,683.83
$2,765,141.61
$48,850,825.44


All other terms and conditions of contract HHSO100201100001C remain unchanged.

END OF MODIFICATION 0014 TO HHSO100201100001C


    
Exhibit


Exhibit 31.1
 
Certification by Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to
Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
I, Phillip L. Gomez, Ph.D., certify that:
 
1.
I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of SIGA Technologies, Inc.;
2.
Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
3.
Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
4.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:
(a)
 Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
(b)
Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
(c)
Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
(d)
Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
5.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
(a)
 All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
(b)
Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
Date: May 4, 2017
 
/s/ Phillip L. Gomez, Ph.D.
Phillip L. Gomez, Ph.D.
Chief Executive Officer



Exhibit


Exhibit 31.2
 
Certification by Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to
Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
I, Daniel J. Luckshire, certify that:
 
1.
I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of SIGA Technologies, Inc.;
2.
Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
3.
Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
4.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:
(a)
 Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
(b)
Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
(c)
Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
(d)
Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
5.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
(a)
 All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
(b)
Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
Date: May 4, 2017
 
/s/ Daniel J. Luckshire
Daniel J. Luckshire
Executive Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer



Exhibit


Exhibit 32.1
 
CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO
18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,
AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO
SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002
 
In connection with the Quarterly Report of SIGA Technologies, Inc. (the “Company”) on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2017 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Phillip L. Gomez, Ph. D., Chief Executive Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that to the best of my knowledge:
 
(1)
The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
(2)
The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.
 
A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to the Company and will be retained by the Company and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request.
 
/s/ Phillip L. Gomez, Ph.D.
Phillip L. Gomez, Ph.D.
Chief Executive Officer
May 4, 2017



Exhibit


Exhibit 32.2 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO
18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,
AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO
SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002
 
In connection with the Quarterly Report of SIGA Technologies, Inc. (the “Company”) on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2017 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Daniel J. Luckshire, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that to the best of my knowledge:
 
(1)
The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
(2)
The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.
 
A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to the Company and will be retained by the Company and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request.
 
/s/ Daniel J. Luckshire
Daniel J. Luckshire
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
May 4, 2017